Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 130,457 pages of information and 207,683 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

A. C. Wells and Co

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search
1884.
Marine Boiler Water Space Lamp.
Marine Boiler Water Space Lamp.
Marine Boiler Water Space Lamp.
No. 18 Kettle Torch Lamp
Wells "Unbreakable" No. 18 Kettle Torch Lamp.
Wells "Unbreakable" No. 18 Kettle Torch Lamp.
Im20131127-Wellsa.jpg
Im20131127-Wellsb.jpg
Safety Lamp.
Safety Lamp (detail).
March 1888.
1895.
June 1888. Wells Light.
‎‎
1889.
May 1896.
June 1898.
1899.
1899.
1899.
February 1901.
January 1902.
September 1902.
‎‎
1905.
1909.
1912.
1913.
1913.
1918.
1918.
Dec 1921.
1921.
1926.
1926.
1936.
1938.
1943.
1943.
1945.
1946.
1951. Advert for waste oil filters.
1951.
1960.
1961.
1969.

A. C. Wells and Co of 43 Carnarvon Street, Cheetham, Manchester.

Also of 103/5 Midland Road, St.Pancras, London N.W.1.(1926) [1]

See Arthur Collings Wells

1881 Advert. Oil Cans, Engineer's Lamps. A. C. Wells and Co, Exchange Building, Cromford Court, Market Street, Manchester.[2]

1882 Advertising 'The House Lamp of the Future. WELLS' PATENT UNBREAKABLE BENZOLINE HOUSE LAMPS. DO NOT LEAK! DO NOT BREAK ! ! Safety from destructive fires. Entirely superseding flimsy brass lamps. Price 1s 6d and 1s 10d. Write for Lists. Ask your ironmonger or Stores to get you some, giving this address. Everyone who has them is pleased. Orders of 6 carefully packed and Carriage Paid. A. C. Wells & Co., Cromford Court, Market Street, Manchester.'[3]

1888 The Wells' Oil Lamp featured in 'The Engineer'. [4]

1888 The "Wells Light", generated gas from oil for use in lighting(see advert)

1894 Mentions 'Wallwork and Wells' patents.[5] (R. Wallwork and A. C. Wells).

1897 "The "Wells Light " has now become so common, and proved so satisfactory, that surprise may be expressed at its makers bringing out another high-candle-power oil light working on a different principle. The new light is not intended to replace the older one, but for use in circumstances where the 8 or 10 minutes needed for heating the vapouriser cannot be spared, as at fires, breakdowns, &c., where every minute of time becomes of serious import. The new lamp is a spray, and not a vapour lamp, and might accordingly be justly considered as a case of atavism, as the first of all the high-power oil lights was worked on this principle. The lamp consists of a reservoir containing oil and fitted with an air-pump, by means of which a pressure is maintained in the space above the oil. This pressure is then utilised to force the Oil up to the burner in the usual way. At the same time, however, a second pipe coming from the top of the reservoir leads air to the sprayer, which completely breaks up and shatters the oil as it flows from the burner. A pilot light fitted with a wick is kept constantly burning, and immediately the cock shown on the standard is turned the flame starts into full activity. Closing this cock puts out the flame instantly, so that the lamp can be used very conveniently for signalling purposes. The standard, with its oil and air tubes, can be completely detached from the air reservoir, the two tubes aforesaid passing into this reservoir through glands, which, on replacing the apparatus, only require tightening up for the lamp to be ready for use."[6]

1905 Advert for lamps and oil feeders. [7]

1913 Advert for waste oil filters ('over 19,000 sold') and oil cabinets. [8]

1919 Advert for waste oil filters and oil cabinets.

1919 Advert for waste oil filters and oil cabinets.

1927 Advert for waste oil filters. [9]

1932 Appointment of liquidator.[10]

1937 Engineers and paint sprayers. [11]

1940 Advert for barrel pourers. [12]

1945 Advert for waste oil filters, lathe cans and heating plants. (of Alexandra Street, Providence Mill, Hyde) [13]

1960 Advert. Waste oil filters. [14]

Perhaps the most common of the early flare torches is the Wells "Unbreakable" No. 18 Kettle Torch Lamp. Typical of the type that predominated before the introduction of more modern lamps made from sheet metal. The body is a single iron casting as is the separate lid. Several variants existed including one with a twin wick. [15]


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  • Mechanical World Year Book 1917. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p158
  • Mechanical World Year Book 1919. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p194
  1. 1926 image
  2. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Saturday 26 March 1881
  3. Southern Reporter - Thursday 14 December 1882
  4. The Engineer 1888/01/27 p69
  5. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Wednesday 10 January 1894
  6. Engineering 1897/10/08
  7. Mechanical World Year Book 1905. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p385
  8. Mechanical World Year Book 1913. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p401
  9. Mechanical World Year Book 1927. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p159
  10. The London Gazette Publication date:30 September 1932 Issue:33868 Page:6240
  11. 1937 The Aeroplane Directory of the Aviation and Allied Industries
  12. Mechanical World Year Book 1940. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p75
  13. Mechanical World Year Book 1945. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p103
  14. Mechanical World Year Book 1960. Published by Emmott and Co of Manchester. Advert p176
  15. http://roaddangerlamps.webs.com