Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 150,334 pages of information and 235,386 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

1851 Great Exhibition: Official Catalogue: Class V.: Great Western Railway Co

From Graces Guide

501. and 506. GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY.

Locomotive engine and tender, constructed at the company's works at Swindon. One of the ordinary class of engines constructed by this company for passenger traffic since 1847. It is capable of taking a passenger-train, of 120 tons, at an average speed of 60 miles per hour, upon easy gradients. The evaporation of the boiler, when in full work, is equal to 1000-horse power, of 33,000 lbs. per horse—the effective power, as measured by a dynamometer, is equal to 743 horse power.

The weight of the engine, empty, is 31 tons; coke and water, 4 tons—engine in working order, 35 tons.

Tender empty, 9 tons; water, 1,600 gallons, 7 tons 3 cwt.; coke, 1 ton 10 cwt.—total 17 tons 13 cwt.

The heating surfaces are, fire-box 156 feet; 305 tubes 1,759 feet. Diameter of cylinder, 18 inches; length of stroke, 24 inches; diameter of driving-wheel, 8 feet; maximum pressure of steam, 120 lbs.

The actual consumption of fuel in practice, with an average load of 90 tons, and an average speed of 29 miles, including stoppages (ordinary mail train), has averaged 20.8 lbs. of coke per mile.

A traversing-frame as used upon the Great Western Railway, manufactured by Mr. G. Hennett, Bridgewater, for transferring railway carriages from one line of rails to any other parallel line. Short inclined planes are attached to each end, up which the carriage is run upon the flanges of the wheels, and which are there raised clear of the rails by means of a pedal. The main lines of rails are usually lowered about an inch at the place where the frame is placed, so as to diminish by about half the amount what the carriage has to be raised. A model of a safety stop or switch for a siding, worked together with the signal by the same lever as the switch of the siding ; also of double signals for a j unction line worked by the switchman. Manufactured by Mr. Richard Brotherhood, Great Western Railway, Chippenham, Wilts.

The engine and traversing frame are placed upon a portion of permanent way of the construction adopted upon the Great Western Railway.


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