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1856 Mines in Devon and Cornwall

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CORNISH and DEVONSHIRE MINES. [1]

Note: This documment has been scanned from the original and not fully proof-read. Take particular care with numerals as many fractions in the original have been rendered as whole numbers in this version

A

Alfred Consols Mine is in the parish of Phillack, Cornwall. It is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-18th and 1-20th. The mine is worked by an l80-inch cylinder steam-engine, and is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,120 shares. The dividends in 1851 were £9,472, or £1 17s. per share; in 1852, £16,146, or £3 3s. per share; in 1853, £20,736, or £4 ls. per share; in 1854, £15,540, or £3 5s. per share; and in 1855, £5,888, or £1 3s. per share. The purser is H. Noell, of Hayle.

Antron Consols Copper and Tin Mine, Sithney, Cornwall. William Huthnance, purser, Rosewarne United Mines, Hayle, Cornwall.

Arundell United Copper Mine, Ashburton, Devon. J. W. Arundell, purser and secretary, 26 New Bridgestreet, Blackfriars, London.

B

Balleswidden Tin Mine, St. Just, Cornwall, is divided into 1,624 shares, and in 1853 the dividends were £2,500, or 10s. per share. The office is at Penzance. Bassett Graze United Copper and Tin Mines, Kea, Cornwall. The London office is at 55 Old Broad street.

Bedford United Copper Mines are situated near Tavistock, Devon. These mines are held under a lease for 21 years, from 1841, at a royalty of 1-15th. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,000 shares. From 1851 to 1854 the dividends averaged £1 3s. per share. The manager is Mr. Wolferstan. The London offices are at 50 Threadneedle street; G. Kieckhoefer, secretary.

Bell and Lanarth Mines are in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Gwennap; they are situated 2 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at Devoran and Portreath, each about 6 miles from the mines, and the nearest railway station is at Redruth, 2 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years. The country is killas and granite. A deep adit, north and south of the deep valley, has been driven, running between the Bell and Lanarth setts, which intersects the lodes and drains them at a depth of 70 fathoms. The mine is now worked for copper by a 30-inch cylinder steam-engine. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 506 shares. The purser is R. H. Pike, Camborne; the captain is James Higgins.

Bicton Mill Lead Mine, St. Ive, Cornwall. Joseph Penfrase, captain.

Birch Aller Lead Mine, Bridford, Devon, is situated about 1.5 miles from Exmouth. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,500 shares. The office is at Exeter.

Boblowall and Nanpean Mine, St. Just, Cornwall.

Boconnoc Mine is in the parish of St. Winnow, union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, Cornwall; it is situated miles from the town of Bodmin. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Lostwithiel, 2 miles distant from the mine; and the nearest railway station, at Plymouth, is 28 miles distant from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th for all minerals, except iron ore, which is 91. per ton, grantee by Lady Grenville, of Boconnoc, Cornwall. The mine was first opened in October, 1855, and is worked for iron. The purser and captain is John Seymour, of Liskeard.

Boiling Well Mine is in the parish of Phillack, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, and within the bounds of the manor of it is situated 2.5 Miles from the town of Hayle, which is the nearest shipping place and railway station, 315 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-24th, granted by W. Hockin, Esq., of Truro. The known lodes on the sett are three. The south lode runs east and west, and dips 2 feet in the fathom. The engine-shaft is sunk 70 fathoms from the surface. The new shaft is sunk 40 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The 30-fathom level is driven 10-fathoms east. The mine is worked by a 60-inch cylinder steam-engine. In 18.53 the mine was drained. The minerals found in this sett include copper and silver-lead. This mine was worked by a Cornish company in 1819, under the name of Wheal Boil; it is now worked for copper and silver lead. The produce in 1854 was 410 tons of ore, value £2,752; and in 1855, 947 tons of ore, value £6,374. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,000 shares of £1 each. The purser is William Vawdrey, of Penpoll, Hayle; the captain is George Reynolds. The London offices are at 27, Austin Friars, Old Broad-street; the secretary is Mr. Edward King,

Bolenowe Mine is in the parish of Illogan, Cornwall. It is situated to the south of Grenville, and adjoins the southern port of South Francis. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1849. The mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares. The captain is James Roberts. The London offices are at 50 Threadneedle street; the secretaries are Messrs. Morris and Buckley.

Boringdon Consols Mine is in the township of Plympton St. Mary, Devon, and mining district of Devon. It is situated 5 miles from the town of Plymouth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Prince Rock, 4$ miles distant from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plympton, miles distant from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the Earl of Morley, of Saltram, near Plymouth. The country is killas, and the dip south-east. The nearest granite is at Shaugh, 2 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are four. The main lode runs east and west, and dips 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of lead, mundic, gossan, quartz, &e. The second and third lodes run east and west, and dip 2 feet in the fathom; they consist of lead, copper, gossan and quartz. The fourth lode runs north and south, and dips 21. feet in the fathom; it consists of flucan, quartz, and lead. The known crosscourses are flume There have been three shafts sunk. The engine (Murchison's) shaft is sunk 40 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft— The 10, 15, and 30 fathom levels. The Annus engine-shaft is sunk 72 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft—the 12 and 24 fathom levels. The Hitchins shaft is sunk 35 fathoms; there is the 30-fathom level in this shaft. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 70 h.p. The minerals found in this sett include lead, copper, zinc, and mundic. The mine is now worked for lead and copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,096 shares. The purser is Mr. James Wolferstan, of Plymouth; the captain is William Godden. The London offices are 117 Bishopsgate street within; the secretary is J. H. Murchison, Esq.

Boscaswell Downs Tin Mine, St. Just, Cornwall. This mine has not paid any dividends Mime 1849.

Boscean Mine is in the township and parish of St. Just, union of Penzance, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, and mining district of St. Just. It is situated 7 miles from the town of Penzance, which is she nearest shipping place and railway, and 287 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-25th, granted by the Grenville family, John Scobell, Esq., Lady Agar, and others. The country is granite. The known lodes on the sett are three, viz., the South lode, the Neunonick lode, and Gouldings. The known crosscourses are Wheal Owles Guide and Botallack Crowns Lode. There has been a shaft with slides sunk on the south lode. The slide or tramroad shaft is sunk 112 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft: the 40, 52, 64, 74, 86, 96, 108 fathom levels, driven variously. In Goulding's shaft there are the following levels:-the 40, 52, 64, 74, 86 fathom levels, driven variously. The machinery consists of one pumping-engine, 36-inch cylinder, 8 by 7 ft. stroke; one pumping-engine, 40-inch cylinder, 10 by 10 ft. stroke; one stamping-engine, 24-inch cylinder, 8 by 7 ft. stroke; one winding-engine, 20-inch cylinder, 8 by 7 ft. stroke. The steam-stamps comprise 48 heads; the water-stamps comprise 19 heads; making total stamping power, 67 heads. The minerals found in this sett include tin. The produce in 1852 was 23 tons of ore; in 1853, 91 tons of ore; and in 1854, 147 tons of ore. The company is on the cost book system, and consists of 240 shares, with £20 10s. paid, representing a capital of £4,920. The purser is Samuel York, of Herbier-house, Penzance; the captains are John Carthew, Richard Berryman, and James Trezise.

Boscundle Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Austell. It is now worked for copper and tin, and is 100 fathoms in depth. The agent is William Vivian; the proprietor is Joseph Morcom. The offices are on the mine.

Boswedden and Wheal Castle Mine is in the parish of St. Just, union of Penzance, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Just. It is situated 8 miles from the town of Penzance, which is the nearest shipping place and railway station, and 280 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of I-24th. The mine is worked by a 36-inch cylinder steam-engine, and one water-wheel. In 1853, the dividends were £372, or £3 per share. The purser is Richard Pearce, of Penzance.

Botallack Copper and Tin Mine is in the parish of St. Just, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 200 shares. In 1850, the dividends were £5 per share; in 1851, £7 10s. per share; in 1852, £12 15s. per share; in 1853, £32 10s. per share; and in 1854, £55 10s. per share; making the total sum divided, £22,650. The purser is S. H. James, of St. Just. Bottle fill Tin Mine, Plympton, is not working.

Budnick Lead Mine, Rose, Perranzabuloe, Cornwall.

Buller and Basset United Mines are in a good district, and are worked by a 33-inch cylinder steam-engine. The company consists of 6,400 shares.

Butterden Lead Mine, Menherriot, Cornwall. J. Philp, purser; Thomas Glengell, captain

C

Callington Mine is in the township and parish of Callington, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, and mining district of Callington. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Cotehele quay, 5 miles from the mine, end the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 15 from the mine, and 247 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1854, at a royalty of one-quarter, granted by Lord Ashburton, of the Grange, Hants. The country is killas and dark slate, and the dip west. The nearest granite is at Kit Hill, half a mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are three, only one of which is tried. The lead lode runs north and south, and dips 21 feet west in the fathom. It consists of flucan, white iron, and silver-lead. There is one known crosscourse, composed of light slate. There has been one shaft sunk 90 fathoms, on an incline of 41 feet in 6, from which all minerals and rubbish are drawn. There is a small portable steam-engine which draws up all minerals and rubbish on an inclined plane; also a crusher attached to the engine, for crushing up the minerals. The mine is drained by the Holmbash Mine adjoining. The minerals found in this sett include silver-lead and copper ore. The mine was first opened in 1833, and was worked by Peter Stainsby and others, under the name of Redmore Mine; it was afterwards worked by the same persons under the name of Callington Mines, and abandoned in 1853, and is now worked for silver lead by Mr. Robert Serjeant only. The produce in 1851 was 597 tons of ore, or 417 tons of metal; in 1852, 243 tons of ore, or 154 tons of metal, and 7,700 ounces of silver; in 1858, 118 tons of ore, or 71 tons of metal, and 4,118 ounces of silver; in 1854, 71 tons of ore, or 43 tons of metal, and 2,595 ounces of silver; in 1855, 10 tons of ore. The owner and purser is Mr. R. Serjeant, of Callington; the captain is Lawrence Rippon.

Calstock Consols Mine is in the parish of Calstock, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, and mining district of Callington. It is situated 4 miles from the market town of Callington, 15 from Plymouth, where there is a railway station, and 261 from London. The mine is bounded on the east by the river Tamar, where they have a wharf for shipment of minerals. The mine is held under a lease from the Duke of Cornwall and the Right Hon. Baron Ashburton, at a royalty of 1-15th. The mine was worked in 1846, under the name of Danescombe, by John Bayly, Esq., of Plymouth, and others, and is now worked by the name of Calstock Consols, by John Bayly, Esq., solicitor, Plymouth, and others. It is divided into 5,384 parts or shares, upon which £4 10s. per share has been paid up, representing a sum of £24,228. The known lodes in the sett are eight, running east and west, three of which underlie north, and the other five underlie south. The country is killas, and the cleavage the same; as the lodes underlie, one of the above is a flucan lode. On one of the above lodes a level has been driven east into the hill from the valley, upwards of 150 fathoms. Crosscuts were extended, both north and south, 128 fathoms. In the north cross-cut two of the above, east and west lodes, are now proving very productive. A powerful water-wheel is on the mine, but for the present idle.

The returns of mundic were-

  • 1850 199 Tons - 0 Cwt - 0 Qtr. yielding £70-16-8
  • 1851 30 Tons - 9 Cwt - 0 Qtr. yielding £22 16 5
  • 1853 58 Tons - 0 Cwt - 0 Qtr. yielding £21 15 0
  • 1854 105 Tons - 9 Cwt – 2 Qtr. yielding £31 13 4
  • Total 392 Tons - 18 Cwt - 2 Qtr. Yielding £147 1 5

There have been no dividends since the commencement. The agent on the mine is William B. Callom; the purser is John Bayly, Esq., solicitor, Plymouth; and the secretary, - Channon, Esq., Exeter.

Camborne Consols Copper Mines, Camborne, Cornwall. J. Pascoe, secretary, 50 Threadneedle street, London.

Camel Slab and Slate Quarry, at Carhart, in the parish of St. Breock, union of St. Columb, hundred of Pydar, Cornwall. It is situated 21 miles from the towns of Wadebridge and Padstow, and on the bank of the river Camel. The slate is shipped from quays adjoining the quarry, to which vessels of any size can approach. The quarry is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1854, renewable for a further term of 21 years, at a rent of £100 per annum, granted by Mr. Thomas Key, of Carhart aforesaid. The quarry is drained, and the slate raised by a steam-engine of 26-inch cylinder, and the slabs sawn and planed and otherwise manufactured by an engine of 16-inch cylinder. The machinery, erected in September, 1855, is of a superior description, and complete for the purposes intended. Slabs of large size are riven, some upwards of 100 superficial feet, and the slate cleaves well for covering purposes. This quarry was first opened many years since by the proprietor and worked on a small scale, and is now being carried out extensively; the quantity of rock being wrought on is about an acre, and lies about 60 feet from the surface. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 32 shares, principally held by gentlemen resident in the neighbourhood. The amount expended to Christmas, 1855, is £9,600, and several thousand more capital will be required; the slate now (November, 1855) rising being about sufficient to pay two-thirds of the monthly working costs. The purser is Edmund Hambly, Esq., of Wadebridge; the captain and manager is Mr. James Maylor, resident on the works.

Caradon Consols Copper Mine, St. Cleer, Cornwall. The purser is E. J. Cole, of 2 New Broad street, London.

Carclaze Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Austell. It is situated on an elevated tract of land about 2 miles north of the town. From the summit of this rising ground the mine is sunk, open, somewhat in the shape of an enormous bowl, the surface of which measures upwards of 12 acres; its circumference inure than a mile. It is supposed to have been in working more than 400 years, and until about 1851 for tin exclusively, but is now worked for china-clay, of which an immense quantity is washed from the decomposed granite of which its strata consists. The managers are John Lovering and Robert Martin, at the mine.

Carn Brea Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of John Francis Basset, Esq., duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Illogan. It is situated 1.5 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 2 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Pool, half a mile from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-19th, granted by John Francis Basset, Esq., of Illogan. The country is granite and slate. The mine is worked and drained by steam-engines. The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, and arsenic. This mine was first opened in 1832 by the present company, and is one of the most important in the county; It is now worked for tin and copper. The produce in 1851 was 7,221 tons of copper ore, or 593 tons of metal, and 427 tons of tin ore; in 1852, 6,199 tons of copper ore, or 463 tons of metal, and 354 tons of tin ore; in 1853, 7,336 tons of copper ore, or 453 tons of metal, and 307 tons of tin ore; in 1854, 5,805 tons of copper ore, or 337 tons of metal, and 290 tons of tin ore; in 1855, 6,082 tons of copper ore, or 331 tons of metal, and 249 tons of tin ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,000 shares, with £15 paid, representing. a capital of £15,000. The dividends, in 1851, were £7,000, or E7 per share; in 1852, £6,000, or £6 per share; in 1653, £12,000, or £12 per share; in 1854, £2,000, or £2 per share; and in 1855, £4,000, or £1 per share. The purser is Robert Hart Pike, of Camborne; the captain is Joseph Lyle. The London offices are at 4 Queen street place, Upper Thames street; the secretary is Frank Rochfort, Esq.

Carnvivian Mine is in the parish of Warleggon, union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, Cornwall, and within the bounds of the manor of Lord Vivian. It is situated 7 miles from the town of Bodmin. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Moorswater, 7 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 247 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-16th, granted by Lord Vivian, of Glyn, Bodmin. The country is elvin and slate. There has been one shaft sunk 7 fathoms. The mine is worked by water-power, and was first opened in 1855; it is now worked for copper and lead. The purser is Richard Bray, of Bodmin; the captain is William Oates.

Carnyorth Mine is in the parish of St. Just, union of Penzance, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Just. It is situated 6 miles from the town of Penzance, which is the nearest shipping place and nearest railway station, 280 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-24th, and is worked for tin. The mine is worked by a 30-inch cylinder steam-engine. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 2,048 shares, with £3 paid, representing a capital of £6,144. The dividends in 1855 were £922, or 9s. per share. The purser is Richard Pearce, of Penzance.

Carrack-Dews United Mines are in the parish of St. Ives, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Ives. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by George V. Hichens, Esq., Lord Wellesley, and Lewis Stephens, Esq. All the lodes on the sett dip east. There has been two shafts sunk 45 and 35 fathoms from edit. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 36-inch cylinder. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin, principally the former. The produce in 1855 was 45 tons of ore, and in 1856, up to April, 75 tons. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 8,500 shares, with 18s. paid, representing a capital of £16,150. The captains are William Hollow, jun., and Martin Dunn. The London offices are at 4 Adam's court, Old Broad street; the secretary is Charles John Eley.

Carvath United Mines are in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. The machinery comprises one steam-engine for stamping, and one for drawing and crushing. This mine is now worked for copper and tin, and is 70 fathoms in depth. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,400 shares. The purser is William Browne; the captain is John Webb. The London offices are at 58 Old Broad street; the secretary is William C. Foulkes.

Cavannal Copper Mine, Gwennap, Cornwall.

Clowance Wood Mining Company. Samuel Cardozo, secretary, 3 Old Broad street, London.

Clyjah and Wentworth Mines are in the township, parish, and union of Redruth, Cornwall, and mining district of Redruth. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place fur ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4 miles distant from the mines. The mines are held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by J. W. Buller, Esq., of Crediton. The country is killas. There are seven known lodes through the sett. Besides the copper lodes now being worked, the old Clyjah tin lode has been lately cleaved up in the old workings, in the 20-fathom level, on the back of which level a bunch of tin, worth £200 per fathom, has been discovered. The mines are worked by a 54-inch cylinder steam-engine, arid drained by an 18-inch crushing and draining engine. The mines are now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares, with £15 5s. paid, representing a capital of £15,616. The purser is R. H .Pike, of Camborne; the captains are James Cudlip and Charles Glasson; the London offices are at 27 Austin Friars; the secretary is Edward King.

Collacombe Mine is in the township and parish of Lamerton, union and hundred of Tavistock, Devon, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Collacombe, and mining district of Tavistock. It is situated 3.1 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Morwellham, 4 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 18 from the mine, and 213 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1854, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Sir William B. Call, Bart., of Whiteford House, Stoke Climsland, Cornwall. The country is killas or clayslate, and the dip north. The nearest granite is at Trementor, 2 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are four; there are several known crosscourses. The engine shaft is sunk 60 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:— The 26 and 50-fathom levels driven east a great distance. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 30-inch cylinder, 50 h.p. There is a 22-inch cylinder 25 h.p. hauling arid crushing engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper only. This mine was first opened in 1854; this mine is now worked. for copper; the produce in 1855 was 200 tons of ore, or 20 tons of metal. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,000 shares, with £10 paid, representing a capital of £10,000. The amount expended to September, 1855, is 0,500. The captain is Samuel Michell; the London offices are 50 Threadneedle street; the secretaries are Messrs. Morris and Buckley.

Condurrow Mine is in the parish of Camborne, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of the executors of E.W.W. Pendarvis, Esq., and mining district of Camborne. It is situated 1 mile south of the town of Camborne; the nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at Portreath and Hay le, the former 4 miles, the latter 71 from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Camborne, three-quarters of a mile from the mine, and 260 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1844, at a royalty of 1-20th, granted by Edward William Wynne Pendarvis, Esq., M.P., of Pendarvis, to Captain Nicholas Vivian, of Cam borne. The country is granite, and the dip northerly: the nearest slate is three-quarters of a mile distant. There are two crosscourses, which heave the lodes 18 feet south; the general dip of these is easterly, but the eastern crosscourse in the under levels has changed its underlie to westerly, and increased in size from 60 to 80 feet wide. The known lodes on the sett are eight; the main lode runs 5° north of east, and dips southerly 18 inches in the fathom. It consists of copper ore, tin ore, zinc, gossan, flucan, quartz, and fluor spar. The Llandowr lode runs nearly parallel, and dips 21 inches in the fathom; it consists of chlorite, tin, copper, zinc, and quartz. The south lode runs parallel, and dips southerly 12 inches in the fathom; it consists of chlorite and copper pyrites. There is very little done in the other five lodes, but their characteristics are very similar. The known crosscourses are two, decomposed granite and clay. Ground has been explored in sinking shaft, driving crosscuts, and extending levels, to the amount of 14,500 fathoms, which has occupied eleven years in its execution. The mine is worked by a 36-inch cylinder steam-engine, 9 feet by 8 feet stroke, which drains the mine to the depth of 180 fathoms. There is a steam whim of 18-inch cylinder, horizontal high-pressure, employed in drawing the ore, &c., and a vertical steam-engine employed in crushing the ore. Five stamping engines, lifting 48 heads, are worked by water-wheels in reducing tin stuff. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin ore. This mine was first opened in 1700, and was worked by Sir William Pendarvis, of Pendarvis, under the name of Condurrow; it was afterwards worked by Mr. Roger Vivian under the same name. This mine is now worked for copper and tin ore; the produce in 1851 was 1,650 tons of copper ore, and 86 tons of block tin; in 1852, 1,565 tons of copper ore, and 96; tons of block tin; in 1853, 1,778 tons of copper ore, and 107 tons 13 cwt. of block tin; in 1854, 1,453 tons of copper ore, and 122 tons of block tin; in 1855, 1,885 tons of copper ore, and 93; tons of block tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares of £20 each, with £20 paid, representing a capital of £5,120. The amount expended to end of May, 1855, is about £95.000; returns £111,000. The dividends in 1851 were £512, or £2 per share; in 1852, £3.072, orf12 per share; in1853, £4,608,or £18 per share; in 1854, £2,301, or £9 per share; and in 1855, £2,048, or £8 per share. The purser and manager is Nicholas Vivian, of Camborne; the captains are C. Davey and Joseph Vivian; clerk, John Trestan.

Consolidated Mines are in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, hundred of Kerrier, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Cusgarne, and mining district of Gwennap; it is situated 3 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Devoran, 3 miles distant from the mine. The name is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1839, at a royalty of 1-24th, granted by Lord Clifford, Lord Clinton, Henry Prynn Andrew, Esq., the Rev. H. M. St. Aubyn, and the executors of the late Richard Oakley. Esq. The country is slate. The nearest granite is at Carn Marti], I mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are two-Wheal Fortune lode runs north-east, and dips 2; feet in the fathom; in consists of copper. The Taylor's lode runs east and west, and dips 2; feet in the fathom. The mine is drained by three steam-engines. The minerals found in this sett include copper, and a small quantity of tin. The produce, in 1851, was 5,661 tons of copper ore, or 407 tons of metal; in 1852, 5,147 tons of ore, or 344 tons of metal; in 1853, 4,724 tons of ore, or 291 tons of metal; in 1854, 3,225 tons of ore, or 171 torts of metal. A committee of management acts as the purser; the captain is John Richards; the secretary is John Bayed.

Cook's Kitchen Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of John Francis Basset, Esq., and mining district of Illogan; it is situated 3 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest place for shipping ores and machinery is at Portreath, 3.5 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Pool, half a mile from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by John Francis Basset, Esq., of Tehidy, Illogan. The country is granite and slate, and the dip north. The known lodes on the sett are eight.-The Duncan's lode runs east and west, and dips 2; feet in the fathom; it consists of copper and tin. The Chapel's lode runs east and west, and dips 2; feet in the fathom; it consists of copper and tin. The north Tincroft lode runs east and west, and dips 4 feet in the fathom; it consists of copper and tin. There have been three shafts sunk. The Duncan's shaft is sunk 190 fathoms from surface. There are the following levels in this shaft:-29, 47, 65, 72, 94,1U3, 118, 126, 140, and 160 fathom levels. The Chapel's shaft is sunk 240 fathoms from surface. There are the following levels in this shaft: -42, 65, 72, 92, 100, 111, 121, 133, 140, 148, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200, and 210. The 180-fathom level is driven 150 fathoms. The North Tincroft shaft is sunk 150 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft:-42, 65, 80, 90, 100, 110, and 125 fathoms; the 100 and 125 fathom levels are driven 30 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by steam-engines and waterpower. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine was first opened in 1755, and formerly yielded enormous returns of copper ore; it is now worked for copper. The purser is Robert H. Pike, of Camborne; the Captain is Charles Thomas.

Copper Hill Copper Mine, Redruth, Cornwall.

Craddock Moor Copper Mine, St. Cleer, Cornwall. E. A. Crouch, purser.

Crow Hill Mine is in the parish of St. Stephen's, Cornwall. The mine is worked by water-power; and the produce is lead rich for silver. The company is on the costbook system, and now consists of 2,600 shares, a considerable number of them having been either voluntarily relinquished or allowed to be forfeited for non-registration. The purser is William Browne; the captain is J. Puckey. The London offices are at 58 Old Broad street; the secretary is William C. Foulkes.

Cubert Consols Lead Mine, Cubert, Cornwall. It is situated one mile from the church. The returns for the last quarter in 1855 were 48 tons of rich silver-lead. The resident agent is Captain John Trewin. The London offices are at 58 Old Broad street; the secretary is William C. Foulkes.

D

Deviock Mine is in the parish of Cardinham, union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, Cornwall. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Bodmin; the nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Wadebridge, 8 miles from the mine, and 280 miles from London. This mine was first opened in 1855, and is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-16th, granted by Thomas James Agar Robartes, Esq., ALP., of Lanhydrock-house, Bodmin. The country is clayslate, and the dip west. There is one lode on the sett working for silver-lead; it runs 35° east of north, dips west, and consists of lead ores. There has been one shaft sunk 6 fathoms, and driven 45 fathoms east of north; the mine is worked by water power. The minerals found in this sett include lead ores; the mine is now worked for silver-lead, and drained by an adit, at the summit of the hill, 40 fathoms. The purser is Silvanus W. Jenkin, of Liskeard; the captain is Henry William.

Devon and Cornwall United Mine is in the township, parish, union, and hundred of Tavistock, Devon, within the bounds of the manor of Tavistock, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Tavistock; it is situated 4 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at New Quay, on the Tamar (in the sett) and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 16 miles distant from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1845, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the Duke of Bedford, of Woburn Abbey, &c. The country is killas, and the dip south. The nearest granite is at Hingston, 3 miles distant. There are several known lodes. The known crosscourses are two. There have been several shafts sunk. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine 40 h.p., and by a waterwheel 40 feet diameter and 4 feet wide. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened and worked under the name of George and Charlotte. It was afterwards worked by a company under the name of Devon and Cornwall United Mines. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. The purser is John Ware, of Exeter; the captain is Thomas Neal.

Devon Great Consols Mine is in the township, parish, union, and hundred of Tavistock, Devon, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of the Duke of Bedford, and mining district of Tavistock; it is situated 4 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Morwellham, 4 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 18 miles from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1844, at a royalty of 1-12th, granted by the Duke of Bedford, of Woburn Abbey, Milton Abbot, etc. The country is killas, and the dip south. The nearest granite is at Frementor (in the sett). The known lodes on the sett are three. There are several known crosscourses. There have been 18 shafts sunk. The mines are worked by steam-engines and by water-power, two steam-engines of 50 h.p. each for pumping; four steam-engines of 20 h.p. each, for hauling and crushing; two water-wheels, 40 feet by 12 feet, for pumping; and several smaller wheels for hauling and crushing. The mines are drained by all the engines. The minerals found in this sett include copper only. The mines were first opened in 1844, and are worked by a London company, under the name of the Devonshire Great Consolidated Copper Mining Company. These mines are now worked for copper. The produce in 18,51 was 18,946 tons 8 cwt. of ore, or £118,478 16s. 2d.; in 1852, 20,886 tons 14 cwt. 3 qrs. of ore, or £147,657 5s. (id.; in 1853, 24,009 tons 18 cwt. of ore, or £158,076 153. ld.; in 1854, 24,076 tons 10 cwt. 1 qr. of ore, or £152,709 2s. 8d.; in 1853, to the end of November, 20,416 tons 13 cwt. 2 qrs. of ore, or £126,349 2s. 11d. The company is on the joint-stock system, and consists of 1,024 shares, with £1 paid, representing a capital of £1,024. The dividends in 1851 were £40,960, or £40 per share; 1852, £46,080, or £45 per share; in 1853, £65,024, or £63 10s. per share; in 1854, £57,344, or £36 per share. The captain is James Richards; the London offices are 77 Gresham house, Old Broad street; the secretary is Alexander Allen, Esq. The company is managed by a board of directors, composed as follows:-W. A. Thomas, Esq., chairman, John Thomas, Esq., and Francis Morris, Esq.; Thomas Morris, Esq., of Tavistock, being the resident director; J. H. Hitchins, Esq., of Tavistock, consulting engineer.

Devon Great Tin Croft, consolidated with the East Birch Tor Tin Mine, is in the township and parish of North Bovey, and union of Newton Abbott, Devon, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of the Earl of Devon, and duchy of Cornwall; it is situated 51 miles from the town of Moreton Hampstead. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Plymouth, 22 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Newton Abbott, 15 miles from the mine. The East Birch Tor Mine was bought and commenced working in 1853, at a royalty of 1-32nd, to the Earl of Devon. The Devon Great Tin Croft is leased from Messrs. French and John Cole, of North Bovey, at a royalty of 1-15th. The country is granite, and the dip south. The known lodes on the sett are three. The south lode runs east and west, and dips 6 inches in the fathom south; it consists of spar, tin ore, and micaceous iron. The Graham's lode runs east and west, and dips 2 feet in the fathom north; it consists of spar, tin ore, and micaceous iron. The North lode runs east and west, and dips 1 foot in the fathom north; it consists of spar, tin ore, and micaceous iron. The known crosscourses are three in number, consisting of decomposed granite running north and south, dipping west. There have been six shafts sunk. The Etheridges' shaft is sunk 24 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The adit level is driven west upwards of 100 fathoms; the 12-fathom level is driven west, 22 fathoms 4 feet; east, 16 fathoms 3 feet; and Graham's lode is driven 28 fathoms 3 feet east. Dix's shaft (which is the edit level) is sunk 23 fathoms. This being an old mine reworked, the other shafts are not at present used. The mine is worked by a waterwheel, three-quarters of a mile from the shaft, connected by iron rods— a bucket lift; the ore is raised by horse-whim. There is a stamping-engine worked by waterpower. The minerals found in this sett include tin ore and micaceous iron. This mine was first opened and worked about 20 years since, under the name of East Birch Tor Mine; these mines are now worked by a Bristol company, under the name of the Devon Great Tin Croft, consolidated with the East Birch Tor mine. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 2,500 shares. The captain is Richard Bawden the secretary is W. Fuller Graham, Montrose-house, Clifton, Bristol.

Devon Tin Mine, Dartmoor. Purser and secretary, J. W. Arundell, 26 New Bridge street, Blackfriars.

Devon Wheal Buller Mine is in the parish of Buckland Monachorum, Devon, within the bounds of the lordship of Sir A. Buller, and duchy of Cornwall; it is situated 6 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 200 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Sir Anthony Buller. The country is killas, and the dip south of west; the nearest granite is n miles. The known lodes on the sett are three. The lode runs south, and dips 21 feet in the fathom; it consists of copper. The known crosscourses are two, flucan and spar. There have been two shafts sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 34 fathoms. The 20-fathom level is driven 50 fathoms west and 50 fathoms east. The western shaft is sunk 10 fathoms. The 10-fathom level is driven east 5 fathoms. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 30-inch cylinder. This mine was first opened in 1853, and was worked by Sir A. Buller and partners, under the name of Devon Wheal and Buller; it was afterwards worked by Sir A. Buller and Company under the same title. The mine is now worked for copper. The produce, in 1855, was 86 tons of ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,566 shares., The captain is William Neill. The London offices are 20 St. Helen's place, Bishopsgate st.; the secretary is Henry Peet, Esq.

Dolcoath Mine is partly in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Tehidy, duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Camborne; it is situated 12 miles west from the town of Truro, and 3 west of Redruth. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at Portreath, 3 miles, and Hayle 7 from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Camborne, 1 from the mine, and 264 distant from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1849, at a royalty of 1-24th, granted by the late Lady Basset, of Tehidy park. The country is clayslate and granite; and the dip of the clayslate is northward. The most curious geological phenomenon in this mine is a fact first noticed by the managing Captain, Charles Thomas, about 25 years since, viz., that the run or bearing of the lodes is the principal cause of their richness for copper ore; for although some copper is found on almost any point or bearing of the lodes, yet the lodes have never been rich for copper, except when the bearing has been between 10° north of the present magnetic east or south of west, and 60° south of the present magnetic east or north of west. The cleavage of the clay slate is nearly present magnetic north and south. The mine is in granite and clayslate. The known lodes on the sett are six distinct lodes, and seven or eight branches or small ones. The principal lode runs about magnetic east and west, and dips south 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of tin, copper, quartz, fluor spar, iron pyrites, chlorite, iron, &c. The north lode runs about magnetic east and west, and dips north 4 feet in the fathom; it consists of copper, quartz, iron, and iron pyrites. The counter lode runs 45° south of east, and dips south 2-1 feet in the fathom; it consists of grey and yellow sulphurets of copper, black oxides, quartz, fluor spar, etc. The known crosscourses are seven, filled with soft granite, while they traverse granite and soft clay or flucan when in clayslate or killas. The eastern or large crosscourse has heaved the principal lode 70 fathoms south; the other lodes at smaller distances. There have been 12 shafts sunk about 200 fathoms from the surface, and 8 or 10 others of different depths. The engine-shaft is sunk 277 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The 242-fathom level is driven east 2 fathoms, and west 2 fathoms; 230 -fathom level driven east 20 fathoms, west 60 fathoms; 220-fathom level, east 20 fathoms, west 80 fathoms; 210-fathom level, east 60 fathoms, west 80 fathoms; 190-fathom level, east 100 fathoms, west 300 fathoms; 180-fathom level, east 100 fathoms, west 350 fathoms; 170 fathom level, east 300 fathoms, west 300 fathoms. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 80 h.p. The machinery comprises a steam-engine for draining water, 76-inch cylinder; three winding engines for drawing stuff, about 20-inch cylinders, one steam-engine driving 64 stamp-heads for stamping stuff, 26-inch cylinder; one steam-engine for raising and letting down the miners, 22-inch cylinder. The mine is drained by a steam-engine below the adit, which is 35 fathoms below the surface. The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, arsenic,—and silver, bismuth, and cobalt, in small quantities. This mine was first opened upwards of a 100 years ago, and worked by Cornish adventurers under the name of Buller Garden, and is the oldest copper mine in the county; it is now, and for the last 56 years has been, worked under its present name. The mine is now worked for tin and copper. The produce, in 1851, was about 380 tons of tin ore, or 261 tons of metal, and 1,120 tons copper ore, or 56 tons of metal. Up to 1855 the mine has realised about the same returns. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 179 shares, present value £100 each, with £257,1 paid, representing a capital of £17,920. The amount expended to 1855 is £2,750,000 for labour, cost, and materials. The amount called for from the adventurers is £46,000. The dividends in 1855 were £1,074, or £6 per share; whole amount of dividends £876 9s. per share. A committee of management acts as purser; the managing captain is Charles Thomas, of Camborne; the offices are on the mine; the secretary is William Reynolds, and the subagents are William Provis, Richard Pearce, Josiah Thomas, Camborne, and John Tonkin, Pool.

Drake Walls Mine is in the township and parish of Calstock, Cornwall, within the bounds of the duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Calstock; it is situated 2 miles from the town of Calstock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock quay, 2,1 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 20 from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, -at a royalty of 1-30th granted by the duchy of Cornwall. The country is killas, and the dip south. The cleavage of the clayslate is variable. This mine is now worked for tin and copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,280 shares. The dividends in 1852 were £64, or ls. per share; in 1853, £96, or ls. 6d. per share. The purser is J. Matthews; the captain is W. Webb.

Duke of Cornwall Copper Mine is in the parish of St. Winnow, Cornwall. The purser is David Grafton Goatley, of 31 Threadneedle street, London.

E

East Delabole Slate Company, California Quarry, Boscastle, Cornwall. The captain is Thomas Sweet, at the quarry. The manager is A. H. Patterson, C.E. of St. Stephen's, Cornwall.

East Garras Lead Mine, St. Clement's, Cornwall.

East Gunnislake, now called South Bedford Consols.

East Holmbush Mine is in the township and parish of Stoke Climsland, union of Launceston, hundred of East, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Callington; it is situated 21 miles from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock quay, 4 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 14 from the mine, and 260 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by His Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall. The country is granite and killas, and the dip south and north; the cleavage of the clayslate is north and south; the nearest granite is at Kit Hill. The known lodes on the sett are four or five. The north lode runs east and west, and dips about 21 feet in the fathom; it consists of killas, spar, and mundic spotted with copper ore. The north edit lode runs east and west. The south edit lode runs east and west, and dips 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of killas, caple, and some spots of tin. The known crosscourses are two. There have been two shafts sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 36 fathoms; the 31 fathom levels arid crosscuts driven 50 fathoms. The north shaft is sunk 22 fathoms; there are no levels driven in this shaft. The mine is worked by a 50-inch cylinder steam-engine, 100 h.p. The minerals found in this sett are supposed to be tin and copper. This mine was first opened in 1850, and was worked by Thomas Bartlett and others, under the name of Wheal Tom; it was afterwards worked by the same persons, under the name of East Holmbush. The mine is now worked for copper and tin. The captain is William Rowe, Callington. The London offices are 36 Lombard street; the secretary and purser is Samuel Dowling, Esq.

East Leigh Mine is in the township and parish of Modbury, Devon; it is situated 1 mile from the town of Modbury. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Plymouth, 12 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Wrangeton, 3 from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1851, granted by Mr. Veal. The country is blue slate, and the dip south. This mine is now on trial: they have found nothing yet; it is expected to produce silver-lead, £100 is the sum intended to be expended by way of speculation. The purser is Henry Choake, of Bodmin

East Pool Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Tehidy, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Redruth; it is situated 1 mile from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Pool, a quarter of a mile from the mine, arid about 290 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by the late Lady Basset, of Tehidy park. The country is granite and killas, and the dip is north; the cleavage of the clay slate is north; the nearest granite is on the sett. The known lodes on the sett are two, one north and one south. The north lode runs 6° north of east, and dips 1 foot south in the fathom; it consists of tin and yellow copper ore, mundic, spar, and peach or chlorite. The south lode runs 6° north of east, and dips 31 feet in the fathom; it consists of tin and copper ore, mundic and spar. There is one known crosscourse in the middle of he sett. There have been two shafts sunk. The north shaft is sunk 120 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft—the 120-fathom level is driven east 4 fathoms, and west to the boundary of the sett. The south shaft is sunk 90 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft— the 90-fathom level is driven east 10 fathoms, and west 100 fathoms. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 41 h.p. There is a 60-inch cylinder pumping-engine and two I8-inch cylinder winding or drawing engines. The mine is drained by an adit level, 16 fathoms deep. The minerals found in this sett include tin ore, copper ore, arsenic, &c. This mine was first opened in 1630, and was worked by Mr. William Reynolds under the name of East Pool. This mine is now worked for copper and tits; the produce in 1855 was 2,287 tons of copper ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 128 shares of £150 each, all paid up, representing a capital of £192,000; the dividends in 1854 were £640, or £5 per share; and in 1855, £1280, or £10 per share. A committee of management acts as purser; the captain is William S. Garby.

East Sortridge. See Great and East Sortridge Copper Mine.

East Tamar Silver-Lead Mines are in the parish of Beer Ferris, Devon. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 9,000 shares. The prospects of this mine have much improved lately. The secretary is G. Kieckhoefer, of 50 Threadneedle street, London.

East Tolgus Mine is in the parish and union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Treleigh and mining district of Redruth. It is situated half a mile north of the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, and 264 miles from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 31 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a base fur 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-16th, granted by 14. 1'. Garden and others, of Tonbridge Wells. The country is killas or slate, elvan, and ironstone, and the dip of ironstone and elvan is northeast, and the slate about east and west; the cleavage of the clayslate is west and north; the nearest granite is half a mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are seven. The Redruth Consols lode runs 7° north of east, and dips north 21 feet in the fathom; it consists of copper and quartz. The North Buller lode runs 25° north of east, and dips north 1 foot in the fathom; it consists of copper and quartz. The Counter lode runs 40° south of west, arid dips north 1 foot in the fathom; it consists of copper and quartz. The Renfry lode runs 6° north of east; it consists of copper and quartz, and dips north 21 feet in the fathom. There is one known crosscourse, which consists of flucan and quartz, clayslate, elvan, and ironstone. There have been five shafts sunk. The main shaft is sunk 37 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The 12, 22,34, 100, 110, 5, 60 fathom levels. The Flute Rode shaft is sunk 32 fathoms. The 10-fathom level is driven 48 fathoms. There are two shafts sunk 34 fathoms. The adit is driven 650 fathoms. There is one shaft sunk 27 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a 30-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine was first opened and worked under the name of Wheal Frances; it was afterwards worked under the name of Redruth Consols. This mine is now worked for copper. The produce, in 1851, was 171 tons of ore; in 1852, 1021 tons of ore; In 1853, 81 tons of ore; in 1855, 28 tons of ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares, with £27 Is. 3d. paid, representing a capital of £6,928. The amount expended to December, 1855, is £6,305 9s. 7d. The managers and pursers are John Taylor and Sons, of 6 Queen street place, Upper Thames street; the Captain is Joseph Jewell.

East Wheal Basset Mine is in the parish and union of Redruth, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Tolgus, and mining district of Basset. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, and 264 from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 sears, from 1846, at a royalty of 1-16th, granted by Jas. W. Buller, Esq. The mine is worked and drained by a steam pumping-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper. The mine was first opened in 1851, and is worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares, with £39 paid, representing a capital of £9,984, which has been expended. The purser is William Richards, Esq., of Bank-house, Red ruth.

East Wheal George Copper Mine is in the parish of Walkhampton, Devon. It is situated in the neighbourhood of North Wheal Robert and Sortridge Consols mines. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 2,048 shares. The mine is worked by water-power. The purser and secretary is E. J. Cole, of 2 New Broad street, London.

East Wheal Lovell Mine is in the township and union of Helston, parish of Wendron, and hundred of Kerrier, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Kerrier, duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Helston. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Helston. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Gweek, 2 miles front the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Redruth, 8 miles from the mine, and about 170 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 20 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. The country is granite, and the dip of the lodes north. The nearest granite is at the mine; the sett is all granite. The known lodes on the sett are six in number, and run east and west. There have been three shafts sunk to the deep edit level. The West shaft is sunk 25 fathoms. "The whim shaft is sunk 25 fathoms. The Footway shaft is sunk 25 fathoms. The edit level is driven throws!' the whole of them, and produces tin all through. The mine is worked by a 30-inch cylinder steam-engine. The mine is drained by the deep adit, and is now worked for tin. The company is on the costbook system. The purser is Mr. Parry, of Hayle; the captain is Joel Eade, of Helston.

East Wheal Russell Mine is in the township, parish, union, and hundred of Tavistock, Devon, within the bounds of the manor and mining district of Tavistock. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Morwellham, 1 mile from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 17 miles from the mine, and 265 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the Duke of Bedford. The country is killas, and the dip of the lode south; the cleavage of the clayslate is south-east; the nearest granite is at Frementor, 2 miles distant. The known lodes en the sett are four discovered; the one being wrought, or main lode, runs east and west, and dips south 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of caple, prian, spar, gossan, mundic, and copper ore. The north lode runs east and west, and dips north 3 feet in the fathom; it consists of spars, caples, and gossan. The south lode runs east and west, and dips south 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of spar and caple. The middle lode runs east and west, and is similar to the others. The known crosscourses are two, underlying east, composed of flucan and spar. There have been 3 shafts sunk; the engine-shaft is sunk 100 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:— the adit level, driven 300 fathoms; the tunnel, or 45-fathom level, driven 230 fathoms; the 55, 66, 77, each driven a few fathoms; the 88 and 100, no drivage. The Murchison shaft is sunk 14 fathoms to adit level; the Homersham shaft is sunk to the 55-fathom level. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 40-inch cylinder; there is one combined cylinder drawing-machine. The minerals found in this sett include copper ore only. This mine is now worked for copper. The produce in 1853 was 60 tons 12 cwt. of ore, value £545 lls. 6d.; in 1851, 36 tons 11 cwt., value £160. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,000 shares. The amount expended to end of October, 1855, is £16,600. The purser is W. E. Commune, of Tavistock; the captain is William Metherell. The London offices are 117 Bishopsgate street within; the secretary is J. H. Murchison.

East Wheal Vor Tin and Copper Mine, Sithney, Cornwall. The purser is David G. Goatley, of 31 Threadneedle street, London.

F

The Forest Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwitb, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Illogan. It is situated 2 miles from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4i miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Pool, 1 mile from the mine, and 290 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by the late Lady Basset and the Rev. H. M. St. Aubyn. The country is killas and granite. The mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 512 shares. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne; the captains are Charles and James Thomas.

Fowey Consols Copper Mine is in the parish of Tywardreath, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 494 shares. The purser is Captain Davis, R.M. j the captain is J. Puckey.

Fox Tor Tin Mine, Alternun, Cornwall. Henry Leach, secretary, 9 Austinfriars, London.

G

Gawton United Copper Mines, Tavistock, Devon. T. Fuller, secretary, 51 Threadneedle street, London.

Gernick Mine is in the township of Praze, the parish of Crowan, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Clowance, and mining district of Crowan. It is situated half a mile from the town of Praze. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 5 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Camborne, 2 from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by the Rev. H. St. Aubyn, of Clowance. The country is killas and granite. The mine is worked by a 40-inch cylinder steam-engine. The mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne, the captain is Nicholas Miners.

Gonamena Copper Mine, St. Cleer, Cornwall. In 1852, the dividends were £384, or 7s. 6d. per share. E. A. Crouch, purser. The office is at Liskeard.

Gover Iron Mine is situated on Sparnall Moor, in the parish of St. Mewan, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Austell. The purser is William Brown.

Grambler and St. Aubyn Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Gwennap. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 veers, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by E. W. W. Pendarves, Esq., of Pendarves, Lady Miller, Chas. Trelawny, Esq., and the Marquis of Chandos. The sett is very extensive, and bounded on the north by Wheal Cupid, on the west by Pedn-an-drea, and on the south by Trefusis. The Grambler part of the mine, on which stands the steam-engine, is now suspended, and the present workings are on the St. Aubyn part of the sett, on parallel lodes; three of these are at present opened on, at a depth of 12 fathoms, and 24 fathoms below the edit, which is a very deep one; and the sump-shaft, which communicates with the engine by means of flat rods, is now sunk to the 36-fathom level; this level will speedily be extended east and west, and crosscuts driven north and south to cut other lodes. Of the three lodes at present worked—viz. Richards's, Simmons's and Williams's, the two former will unite in depth. Williams's lode is a large one, and worth in the 12-fathom level 220 to £25 per fathom; it was lately met with in the 24-crosscut, and on this level being extended, judging from the appearance of the 12-fathom, it is likely to become rich and productive. The mine is worked by a steam pumping-engine, also one winding-engine. The mine is now worked for copper and tin. The produce, in 1855, was 102 tons of copper ore, or six tons of metal, yielding £1,101 9s. 6d. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 243 shares. The purser is Wm. Richards, Esq., of Redruth.

Great Beam Tin Mine is in the parish of Roche, Cornwall. It is 80 fathoms deep, and within the mining district of St. Austell. The manager is Mr. Richardson.

Great Crinnis Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. The present company was formed in 1852, and have erected powerful machinery; it is now worked for copper. From 1803 to 1828 it is said that the copper ore raised realised £1,400,000, and that this was extracted from a very small portion of the central lode, which varies from 17 to 24 feet in width. The profits divided are said to have been £400,000. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 30,000 shares. The agent on the mine is Alfred Shaw; the London offices are at 47 Old Broad street; the purser and secretary is Richard C. Manuel.

Great Dougas, or Dougas Consols Mines are in the parish of St. Stephen's, Cornwall. They are situated about 3 miles west of the town of St. Austell, and are now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,000 shares. The mines are worked by a steam-engine of great power. The manager is Peter Floyd.

Great and East Sortridge Consols Mine is in the township and parish of Whitchurch, union and hundred of Tavistock. Devon, within the hounds of the manor or lordship of Tavistock (Duke of Bedford), and mining district of Tavistock. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Morwellham, 7 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 11 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1854, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Colonel Harris, of Radford, near Plymouth. The country is killas, and the dip of the lode north; the cleavage of the clayslate is north. The nearest granite is at Pew Tor, 1 mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are at present two, which run east and west 20° south of east. The underlie of the lodes, as seen at the 25-fathom, is 2 feet a fathom; it consists of copies, spar, prian, and black oxide of copper. There is one known crosscourse composed of spar and gossan. The engine-shaft is sunk 25 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft— the Adit level, driven west 150 fathoms; the 20-fathom level, driven east 9 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a 12-inch cylinder pumping-engine, with drawing-machine attached. The minerals indicated in this sett are copper and tin. The mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 24,000 shares. The purser is W. E. Commins, of Tavistock; the montages is Captain James Richards; the captain is Arthur Down. The London offices are at 11 New Broad street; the secretary is W. L. Webb.

Great Hewas United Mines are in the parish of St. Mewan, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Austell. The present company, which was formed in the spring of 1853, has erected some very powerful machinery, at a cost of about £7,000 for the engines alone, which consist of an 80-inch cylinder pumping-engine, a 40-inch and a 24-inch stamping-engine, and a 40-inch drawing and winding engine. The mine is now worked for tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 30,000 shares. The captain is John Webb. Offices, on the mine.

Great Onslow Consols Copper Mine is in the parish of St. Breward, Hundred of Trigg, and Union of Camelford, Cornwall. The captain and purser is George Rickard.

Great Polgooth Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. Very large returns of tin have been made from this mine by former companies, having been originally at work many years ago. For four years previous to the formation of the present company in January,1851, the mine was in the hands of four gentlemen, who declared dividends to the amount of £13,000 during that time. The works are very extensive, and the machinery valuable and efficient. The mine is now worked for tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 13,750 shares. The purser is William Browne; the captain is J. Puckey. The London offices are at 58 Old Broad street; the secretary is William C. Foulkes.

Great Rough Tor Consols Mine is in the parish of Camelford. Cornwall. The mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 512 shares. The captain is J. Brenton; the London offices are at 50 Threadneedle street; the secretaries or agents are Messrs. Morris and Buckley.

Great Sheba Consols Mine is in the parish of Stoke Climsland, union of Launceston, hundred of East, Cornwall. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Callington, 17 from Plymouth, and 263 from London. The nearest shipping place is Calstock quay, 5 miles from the mine. The mine was first opened in 1838, by the late George Alfred Muskets, Esq., and worked under the name of Great Wheal Martha Consols; it was again set to work in 1851, under the name of Great Sheba Consols, and is now worked by Henry Vetcher, Esq., and others. The mine is held under a lease from His Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall, for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-15th. There are three shafts sunk:— Vetcher's shaft is 18 fathoms deep; the Engine shaft is 40 fathoms deep; the North shaft is 50 fathoms deep. There are the 20, 30, 40, and 50 fathom levels, all of which are driven east and west; tribute pitches are set in each of the levels, from which about 41 tons of copper ore is broken in a fathom of ground. The mine is drained by a water-wheel 40 feet diameter, and 4-feet a breast. The lode dips north, and is composed of spar, mundic, caple, and copper ore. The mine is divided into 1,024 shares; upon each share £2115s. has been paid, and no dividends yet delayed. The -agent on the mine is Nicholas Yelland; the managing agent is Thomas Richards, of Liskeard; the secretary, Henry Vetcher, Eq., of 8 Beaford circus, Exeter, where the offices of the mine are.

Great South Tolgus Mine is in the township, parish, and union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, and mining district of Redruth; it is situated half a mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 3 miles distant from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1819, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by — Buller, Esq. The country is killas, and the dip north. The known lodes on the sett are six, only one working, which runs north, and dips 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of copper. There has been one shaft sunk 80 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares; the dividends in 1855 were £730, or 21. 6d. per share. The purser is Richard Lile, of Pool, Illogan; the captain is John Dawe.

Great Treveddoe Mine is in the parish of Warleggon union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Bodmin; it is situated 6 miles from the town of Bodmin, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at St. Austell, 15 miles from the mine. Tile mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-16th, granted by — Cohan, Esq., of Dnuelen, Devon. The country is granite, and the dip north. The shaft is sunk 18 fathoms. The mine is worked by water-power, and drained by an edit. The mine is now worked for tin. The purser is Richard Goodwin, of Warleggon; the captain is George Rickards. The London offices are at 7 Warkworth-terrace, Limehouse,

Great West Sortridge Mine is in the pariah of Whitchurch, Devon, and mining district of Tavistock. It is bounded on the east by Great Sortridge, and within a Very short distance to the east-of-north of Sortridge Consols and north of North Wheal Robert. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Mr. Thomas Holland Whitehair. The country is white killas. The main lode has been laid open by shode pits altogether 150 fathoms, and proves to be full 8 feet wide, underlying from 14 to 2 feet per fathom, with the same east and west hearing as the whole of the mines of the district, being composed of gossan, very fine caple, mundic, prian, and black and yellow copper ore. There is also a crosscourse about the middle part of the sett, full 5 feet wide, having a Westerly underlie, composed of flucan, prian, and quartz. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened in 1855; it is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists or 6,000 shares of £2 each, with a capital of £6,000, to be reserved for working the mine. The captain is W. Metherell, jun. The London offices are at 50 Threadneedle street; the secretaries are Messrs. Morris and Buckley.

Great Wheal Baddern Lead Mine is in the parish of Kea, Cornwall. It is situated near Truro. The sett extends about 1,000 fathoms on the course of the lode. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,120 shares. The London office is at 50 Threadneedle street. The secretary is G. Kieckhoefer.

Great Wheal Busy United Mines are in the parish of Kenwyn, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Chacewater. It is situated 4 miles from the town of Truro. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 14 from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Chacewater, 270 from London. The mine is held under a lease for '21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-24th, granted by Viscount Falmouth, of Tregothnan, Truro; it is now worked for tin and copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares of £10 each, with 50s. paid, representing a capital of £15,000. The purser is J. Offord, of Plymouth; the captain is John Pascoe, Chacewater. The London offices are at 27 Austin Friars; the secretary is Edward King.

Great Wheal Vor United Mines are in the parish of Helston, Cornwall. These mines are held tinder new leases for 21 years, granted by the Duke of Leeds, C. Trelawney, Esq., C. W. Popham, Esq., Sir J. Y. Buller, Bart., and others, at the rate of 1-36th dues for the principal portion of the ground, and from 1-24th to 1-18th dues for the remainder. They are now worked for tin and copper. At the general meeting held on the 20th June, 1855, a dividend of £5 per cent. was declared, and the shares reduced to 26,666 of £5 each. The chief captain is Michael W. 1Vlartyn; the manager of the dressing department is Captain Oats. The pursers and managers are Messrs. H. & E. Crease, of 17 Gracechurch street, London.

Grey Mare Iron and Lead Mining Company. Joseph May, secretary, 38 Cannon street, London.

Gunnislake Mine, formerly called WERE FOX and CLITTERS, is in the township of Gunnislake, in the parish of Calstock, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Calstock and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Callington, at d formed the greater part of the sett of old Gunnislake mine, formerly worked to great advantage; it is on the border of the river Tamar, situated 5 miles from the town of Callington, and 54 from Tavistock. The nearest shipping port for ores and machinery is at Calstock Quay, 2 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station, Plymouth, 18 from the mine, and 205 from London. The mine is held under leases for 21 years, from 1849, at a royalty of 1-15th dues, granted by His Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall. The country is granite, forming a junction with clayslate or killas. The mine is in granite, and dips every way, or similar to an inverted angle. There are several lodes discovered, all running east and west; one of them, the Great Bunny Lode, is the main lode of Bedford United mines; and the three chief lodes of the sett are the three main lodes which were so profitably worked, a little to the east, by the old Gunnislake adventurers, and one of them is the main lode of Hingston Down Consols, a little to the west of the present works. These lodes were discovered by a crosscut being driven south (into the hill from the level of the river Tamar), some 500 fathoms or more, and ventilated by means of a water-wheel exhausting the foul air from the level through cast-iron pipes 7 inches in the clear or bore. The ore and tubbish, or attle, is brought out in tram-waggons by manual power, and then ceressed and carted to Quay. The minerals found in this sett are copper, and in one instance tin. The mine was formerly worked by Mr. John Williams, of Scorrier, and Mr. Fox, of Falmouth, but is now worked under the name of Gunnislake mine. The managers in London are Messrs. Crease, of 17 Gracechurch street; the agent on the mine is Captain Nicholas Seccombe, who resides at Chilsworthy, Calstock.

H

Halamanning and Croft Gothal Consols Copper Mines are situated in the parish of St. Hilary, Cornwall. The depth is 90 fathoms. The present company was formed in 1850, and consists of 512 shares. The secretary is David Grafton Goatley, of 31 Threadneedle street, London

Hawkmoor Mine is in the township of Calstock, the parish of Calstock and Gunnislake, immediately adjoining to the Devon Great Consols and Bedford United mines, upon the course of the lodes working to a great profit in the latter mine, and are situate west therefrom from the banks of the Tamar river, Cornwall, within the bounds of the duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Calstock, exactly on the division of the counties Cornwall and Devon. It is situated 4 miles from the town of Tavistock, Devon. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock Quay, 1 mile from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 15 from the mine, and 200 from London. The mine is held under a lease of 21 years, from 1848, at a royalty of 1-15th and I-20th, granted by the Rev. H. W. Beauford, of St. Neots, in the county of Huntingdon. The country is clayslate,, and the dip east. The nearest granite is at Callington, about 5 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are five in number: —The Jack Thomas lode runs through a portion of the sett northward; the Tavistock lode runs through the whole length of the sett; the Hawkmoor main lode runs east and west, and dips north 21 feet; it consists of copper ore of good quality; the Marquis lode runs east and west through the sett, and dips south 2 feet; the Delves Kitchin lode runs through the entire length of the sett. The known crosscourses are the Devon Great Consols great crosscourse, and sundry other small crosscourses. There have been four shafts sunk. The Eastern shaft is sunk 42 fathoms, and is now sinking to a greater depth. There are the following levels in this shaft: —the 10, 20 and 30 fathom levels are driven east and west, about 190 fathoms. The Miner's shaft is sunk 43 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: —the 20 and 30 fathom levels, driven east and west, 70 fathoms. The Graham's shaft is sunk 47 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—the 10, 20 and 30 fathom levels, driven about 140 fathoms. The Western shaft is sunk 17 fathoms. There are no levels in this shaft. Sundry winzes are sunk from the 10 to the 20 and 30 fathom levels. The mine is worked and drained by water power; two powerful wheels drawing water, and another drawing stuff, crushing ore, &c. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine was first opened in 1846, and was worked by a company in Cornwall and Devon, under the name of the Hawkmoor Mine; it is now worked by the present company, under the name of the Hawkmoor Mining Company, by deed dated 30th June, 1848. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The produce, in 1852, was £665 10s. 4d. copper ore; in 1853, £530 9s. 9d., and £44 2s. id. tin; in 1854, £1428 8s. 6d. copper ore; and Do 2s. tin; in 1855, £2,312 Os. 2d.; making together £4,936 8s. 9d. copper ore, and £84 4s. Id. tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 8,192 shares of El 2s. each, with £1 2s. paid, representing a capital of £9,011 4s. The amount expended to end October, 1855, is £13,509 15s. 8d. The calls in 18.52 were £1,433 12s., or 3s. 6d. per share; in 1853, £2,457 12s., or 6s. per share; 1854, £2,867 4s. or 7s. per share; and in 1855, £2,252 16s., or 5s. 6d. per share. The purser is Ponsford Fisher, of Plymouth; the Captain is James Richards, Gunnislake. The London offices are at 3 Old Broad street; the secretary is Samuel Cardozo.

Hemerdon Consols Tin Mines, Plympton, Devon. These mines are not in work. The office is at 117 Bishopsgate within, London; and the secretary is J. H. Murchison.

Hennock Lead Mine is near Exeter. It is divided into 1,500 shares. The office is at Exeter.

Herodsfoot Mine is in the parishes of Lanreath and St. Pinnock, union of Liskeard, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Sir J.W. Trelawney, Bart., and Duchy of Cornwall. It is situated 5 miles from the town of Liskeard. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Looe, 7 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 22 from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1845, at a royalty of one 1-20th, granted by Sir J. W. Trelawney, Bart. The country is blue calice, and the dip west. There has been one shaft sunk 150 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 40 h.p. This mine was first opened in 1845, and is now worked for lead. The produce in 1855 was 305 tons, yielding £4,250. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. The dividends in 1851 were 7s. 6d. per share; in 1853, £1 17s. 6d. per share, and in 1854, 7s. 6d. per shape, making a total of E2,688. The purser is James Wolferstan, of Plymouth; the captain is Thomas Trevillion. The London offices are at 13 George yard, Lombard street; the secretary is John Watson.

Hingston Down Consols Mine is in the township and parish of Calstock, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Calstock, and duchy of Cornwall. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock quay, 2 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Plymouth) 17 from the mine, and 263 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1845, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Duke of Cornwall to Mr. Josiah Hitchens and others. The country is granite and clayslate, and the dip west; the cleavage of the clayslate is west. The nearest granite is at Kit-hill, 2 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are five; the north lode runs east and west, and dips north in the fathom 2 feet; it consists of caple, spar, gossan and copper; the middle lode runs east and west, and dips north in the fathom 2 feet; it consists of caple, spar, gossan, and copper. The south lode runs east and west, and dips north in the fathom 2 feet; it consists of same components, with less ore, and other lodes not worked. There is one small crosscourse, composed of spar and granite. There have been three shafts sunk. The western shaft is sunk 50 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: the 20-fathom level driven upwards of 100 fathoms; the 35 fathoms level, and 45 fathoms level. Morris' shaft is sunk 85 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: the 45. 55, 65, 75, and 85 fathom levels. Hitchin's shaft is sunk 75 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: the 20, 35, 45, 65 and 75 fathom levels. In this shaft winzes have been sunk for ventilation. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 50-inch cylinder, with 10-inch pumps. There is a combined cylinder (equal to a 30-inch cylinder) drawing and crushing engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine is now worked for copper ore; great quantities of copper ore have been returned from this mine, the average monthly sales being from 250 to 260 tons, realising upwards of £1,300. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares, with £3 7s. 6d. paid, representing a capital of £20,250; the dividends declared up to November, 1855, were £12,300, or E2 ls. per share. The purser is Wm. E. Commins, of Tavistock; the captains are W. Richards and W. Rosewall. The London offices are at 50 Threadneedle street; the secretary is Gustavus Kieckhoefer.

Hunsdon Consols Mine is in the township and parish Ugborough, Devon. It is situated 2 miles from the town of Ivybridge, which is the nearest railway station, 240 miles distant from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Plymouth, 8 miles distant from the mine.

I

Inney Consols Copper and Silver Lead Mine, South Petherwin, Cornwall. Thomas Lee, purser and solicitor, 26, Moorgate street, London.

Ivybridge Consols Mine is about 1 mile south of the town of Ivybridge, Devon. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th; it is now worked for silver lead. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 12,000 shares. The London offices are at 76 Cornhill; the secretary is Edward S. Codd.

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Kelly Bray Mine is in the township of Callington, the parishes of Stoke Climsland and Callington, unions of Liskeard and Launceston, hundred of East, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Lord Ashburton, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Callington. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Cotehele Quay, 5 miles distant from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 15 miles from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lord Ashburton and the Duchy of Cornwall. The country is clayslate, and the dip south. The cleavage of the clayslate is south. The nearest granite is at Kit hill, a quarter of a mile distant. There are heaves which are carried south from 3 to 4 feet. The known lodes on the sett are three; the north lode rims east and west, and dips south 2 feet in the fathom underlie; it consists of quartz, blende, mundic, and copper ore. The middle lodes run east and west, and dips south 2 feet 6 inches in the fathom underlie; -it consists of quartz, fluor spar, blende, peach, mundic, and copper ore. The south lodes run east and west. The known crosscourses are two, composed of fluor, spar, lead and silver. There has been one shaft sunk 130 fathoms. The second shaft is now being commenced. In the east shaft are the following levels: 25, 50, 60,70, 80, 90, and 100. The mine is worked and drained by a 36-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened in 1848, and was worked by the Callington Mines Company, under the name of Kelly Bray; it was afterwards worked by the Kelly Bray Company, under the name of Kelly Bray Mine. This mine is now worked for copper. The purser is William Watson, of Calstock; the captain is Silas James. The London offices are at 27, Austinfriars, Old Broad street; the secretary is Mr. Edward King.

Kenneggy Copper Mine, Breage, Cornwall. It is divided into 2,048 shares, and a dividend of 4s. per share was paid in March, 1854.

Kit Hill Wheal Mary Mine is in the township and parish of Callington, union of Liskeard, hundred of East Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor and milling district of Callington. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Cotehele Quay, 4 miles from the mine; and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 14 from the mine, and 261 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lord Ashburton, of the Grange, Alresford, Hants. The country is dark blue caple, with quartz, mica, &c., and the dip north and south; the cleavage of the clayslate is north and south. The nearest granite is at Kit hill. The known lodes on the sett are three tin and two copper. Toe first tin lode runs east and west, and dips north 3 feet in the fathom; it consists of caple, quartz, and mica, with spots of tin. The second tin lode runs east and west, and dips south. The third tin lode runs east and west, and dips south 3 feet in the fathom; it consists of caple, quartz, and mica, with tin. The two copper lodes run east and west, dip south 3 feet in a fathom, and contain peach, prian, and quart z, spotted with copper ore. There are no known crosscourses. There have been two shafts sunk, 13 fathoms and 5 fathoms. The engine in the tin lode shaft is sunk 13 fathoms. The copper lode shaft is sunk 5 fathoms. There are many shafts sunk by the ancients, the deepest of which is 30 fathoms. Several edits have been driven into the mountain, and many flu lodes discovered, producing mineral more or less. Preparations are now being made to prosecute the mine with more vigour. The mine is worked and drained by a horse-whim at present. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper. This mine was first opened in 1849, and was worked by Edward Timewell and others, under the name of Wheal Tonkin. It was afterwards worked by C. Netherwood, Esq., under the name of Kit Hill Wheal Mary, on the costbook system. The mine is now worked for copper and tin. The purser is R. Sarjeant, Esq., of Callington; the captain is William Knott; the secretary is C. Netherwood, Esq.

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Lady Bertha Copper Mine, Buckland Monachorum, Devon.

Lamherooe Wheal Maria Mine is in the parish of Lamerton, union of Tavistock, Devon. It is situated 6 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock, about 4 miles distant from the mine, and the nearest railway station Plymouth, '20 from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease, at a royalty of 1-12th, granted by James Lethbridge, of Lamerhooe. The country is killas, and the dip north-west. The nearest granite is at Kit hill, about 1 mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are eleven, running about east and west; two underlying south, the others north; dips various. The known crosscourses are two, underlying west, and composed of quartz. The two engine-shafts are sunk 60 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 60-inch cylinder. The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, and lead. This mine was first opened in 1845. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,233 shares. The purser is J. Matthews, of Tavistock; the resident captain is Thomas Michell. The London offices are at 6 Queen street place; the managers are J. Taylor and Sons.

Latchly Consols Mine is in the township of Latchly, the parish of Calstock, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Callington. It is situated 4 miles from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock quay, 22 miles from the mine, the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 18 from the mine, and 264 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by his Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall. The country is light blue killas, and the dip north and south. The nearest granite is at Whit rocks, half a mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are three. The No. 1 lode runs east and west, and dips north 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of killas, soft spar, and flucan. The No. 2 lode runs east and west, and dips north 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of capel, mundic, and copper ore. The No. 3 lode runs east and west, and dips 22 feet in the fathom; it consists of mundic and spots of yellow ore. The known crosscourses are two:—one is com posed of white spar, and 2 feet wide; the other of blue clay, 3 feet wide, running north and south. There has been one shaft sunk 50 fathoms; the 20-fathom crosscut is driven 4 fathoms; the 28-fathom level is driven 18 fathoms; and the 40-fathom level is drivel, 20 fathoms. The mine is worked by a portable steam-engine, equal to 25 h.p. There are two waterwheels—one is 18 feet in diameter and 1 foot 8 inches wide; and the other is 12 feet in diameter and 4 feet wide. This mine is drained by steam and water power. This mine was first opened in 1853, and was worked by William Matthews and William Bull Harvey, of Tavistock, under the name of Latchly Consols; it was afterwards worked by Thomas Bartlett and others, under the same name. The mine is now worked for copper ore. The produce in 185& was 10 tons of ore. The mine is on the costbook system, and is now worked privately. The captain is William Rowe, of Callington. The London offices are at 36 Lombard street; the secretary and purser is Samuel Dowling, Esq.

Leeds and St. Aubyn Consols Tin Mines, Germoe, Cornwall. The offices are at Helston, and on the mines.

Lelant Consols Tin Mine, Uny Lelant, Cornwall.

Levant Copper and Tin Mine is in the parish of St. Just, Cornwall. It is divided into 160 shares. In 1851 the dividends were £3,361, or £21 per share; in 1852 and 1853, £320, or £2 per share; and in 1854 and 1855, £960, or £6 per share. The purser is H. Borrow, of Truro.

Lydford Consols Lead Mines are in the parish of Bridestowe, Devon. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,056 shares. The captain is J. Richards. The London offices are at 117 Bishopsgate street within; the secretary is J. H. Murchison.

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Marke Valley Consols Mine is in the parish of Caradon, Cornwall. The nearest shipping place is at Looe. The mine is worked by a 70-inch cylinder steam-engine. It is now worked for copper. In 1855 the sum realised for copper ores was £10,135 5s. 6d. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares, with £4 10s. 6d. paid, representing a capital of £27,150. The dividends, in 1853, were £750, or 2s. 6d. per share; and in 1855, £900, or 3s. per share. The purser and captain is James Seccombe. The office is at Salisbury; the secretary is John Harding, Esq.

Messer Mine is in the parish of Lanivet, union of Bodmin, hundred of Trig, Cornwall, within the bounds of the lordship of Thomas Simmons, Esq., and mining district of Bodmin; it is situated 2 miles from the town of Bodmin. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Wadebridge, 9 miles from the mine; and the nearest railway station at Dunmere, 3 from the mine, and 275 from London. The mine is held under a lease for '21 years, from 1852, at. a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Thomas Simmons, Esq., The country is clayslate, and the dip north. The nearest granite is at Trebell hill, quarter of a mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are three. The Messer main lode runs east and west, and dips north about 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of copper ore, iron pyrites, quartz, &c. The William's north lode runs east and west, and dips north 2 feet 6 inches in the fathom; it consists of copper ore, iron pyrites, quartz, &c. The Williams' south lode runs east and west, and dips about 2 feet 2 inches in the fathom; it consists of copper ore, quartz, peach, &c. There have been seven shafts sunk in the mine; the deepest shaft is sunk 70 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—the 10,20, 30, 40, and 50 fathom levels. The adit level is driven 350 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 72-inch cylinder, with one 11-inch steam whim, and it is now worked for copper ores. The produce in 1855 realised £1,464. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares, with £76 paid, representing a capital of E19,456. The purser and captain is James Polglase, of Bodmin. The London offices are at 13 George yard, Lombard street; the secretary is John Watson, Esq.

Mineral Court Tin Mine, St. Stephen's, Cornwall.

Molland Mine is in the township and parish of Molland, union of Southmolton, Devon, within the bounds of the manor of Molland, and mining district of Southmolton; it is situated 6 miles from the town of Southmolton. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Barnstaple, 20 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Tiverton, 16 from the mine. The mine is held under a lease, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Sir Robert Throckmorton, Bart., of Buckland. The country is hilly, and the dip south and north. The slides dip south in general. The known lodes on the sett are the main and the north. The main lode runs north of west, and dips south in the fathom very trifling; it consists of quartz, carbon of iron, and yellow copper ore. The north lode runs north of west, and dips 3 feet In the fathom south; it consists of limestone and quartz. There are no known crosscourses. There have been six shafts sunk. The south shaft is sunk 30 fathoms; the engine shaft is sunk 62 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: — The adit level is driven 60 fathoms; the 20-fathom level is driven 50 fathoms; the 30-fathom level is driven 80 fathoms east and 60 fathoms west; the 42-fathom level is driven 57 fathoms east and 42 fathoms west; the 52-fathom level is driven 46 fathoms east and 23 fathoms west; the 62-fathom level is driven 30 fathoms east. The mine is worked by water-power, The wheel is 36 feet in diameter, 2 feet 6 inches breast in the water, and 6 feet stroke. There is a crushing machine. The mine is drained by 8-inch bucket and 9-inch plunger. The minerals found in this sett include yellow and grey copper ore, and a small portion of silver. This mine is now worked for copper ore. The company consists of 10,000 shares. The captain is Thomas Bennetts. The London offices are 57 Old Broad street; the secretary is William Nicholson.

Mount's Bay Consols Mine is in the township of Marazion, the parish of St. Hilary, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall. within the bounds of the manors of the Duke of Leeds, Mr. St. Aubyn, and others, and Duchy of Cornwall; it is situated near the town of Marazion. Toe nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at St. Michael's Mount, 1 mile from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Marazion, 14 from the mine, and 286 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by the Duchy of Cornwall, Duke of Leeds, and others. The country is clayslate, and the dip south. The nearest granite is at St. Michael's Mount, 1 mile distant. The re are several known lodes on the sett, north and south of the engine shaft, and consist of spar, mundic, jack, and small quantities of copper and tin. There have been two shafts sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 51 fathoms from surface. There are the following levels in this shaft: — The 25, 35, and 45 fathom levels, below adit. The whim shaft is sunk 30 fathoms. At the 25-fathom level in this shaft there are crosscuts driven north 70 fathoms, and south 80 fathoms. In driving north four lodes have been intersected, three of which have been driven upon, and promise to he of value at deeper levels. No. 5, or Wheal Canning Lode, is expected to be cut shortly; and from its promising appearance, in two trial pits, it is expected to turn out well. Driving south, an east and west lode, 2 in 3 feet wide, has been intersected, and driven upon 57 fathoms, and produced a small quantity of tin. This lode has also been driven upon at the 35-fathom level about 12 fathoms. A crosscut at the 45-fathom level, to intersect the north lodes, is just commenced. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 220 h.p. The mine is drained by steam-power at the edit level, 6 fathoms below the surface. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper. This mine was first opened in 1852. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,500 shares, with £3 5s. paid, representing a capital of £17,875. The amount expended to the end of 1855 is about £15,000 The purser is John Carruthers, of Garlisle; the captain is James Richards, Goldsithney; the resident secretary or agent is Mr. David Hamilton, Marazion.

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North Buller Mine is in the township, parish, and union of Redruth, Cornwall, within the bounds of the Duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Redruth; it is situated 1 mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, and 288 from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4 miles from the mine. The-mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners of England. The country is killas and granite. The mine is worked by a 36-inch cylinder pumping-engine. This mine adjoins North Basset westward, and has all the north lodes of that rich mine. It is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne; the manager is Joseph Vivian. The London offices are at 27 Austinfriars; the secretary is Edward King.

North Crenver Mine is in the parish of Crowan, union of Helston, hundred of East Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manors of Clowance and Illogan, and mining district of Crowan; it is situated 4 miles from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 6 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Gwinear road, 3 from the mine, and 291 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-24th, granted by the Rev. Header Molesworth St. Aubyn, of Clowance, in the parish of Camborne. The country is killas, and the dip south-west. The nearest granite is on the sett. The known lodes on the sett are five. The engine lode runs 10° south of east, and dips north 6 inches in the fathom. It consists of copper. The flat-rod shaft lode runs 10° south of east, and dips north 6 inches in the fathom. It consists of copper. There have been two shafts sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 60 fathoms from the surface. There are the following levels in this shaft: 14, 95, 35. The 14-fathom level is driven 16 fathoms; the 25-fathom level about 16; and the 35-fathom level about 2. The flat-rod shaft is sunk 55 fathoms; the edit level is driven 30 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a 40-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper. The mine was first opened in 1852; it is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 512 shares, with £21 paid, representing a capital of £10,752. Tile amount expended, up to 1855, is £10,000. The purser is William Carne, of Falmouth; the captain is Richard Seymour Bryant, Praze, Crowan.

North Downs Mine is in the parish and union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of St. Aubin, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Redruth; it is situated 3 miles from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 3 miles from the mine. The country is slate, and the dip is 75° south-east; the cleavage of the clayslate is therefore nearly north and south. The nearest granite is at Cara Brea, 3 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are fourteen; the Lady lode runs 12° south of east, and dips 1 foot 3 inches in the fathom, south; it consists of quartz and yellow copper ore; all the lodes run in the same direction. The known crosscourses are Bennet's, Trewan’s, and the great crosscourse— porphyry, quartz, and a while felspar clay. There have been three shafts sunk 42 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a 60-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, lead, and silver. This mine was first opened and worked by Messrs. Williams and Sons. The purser is Edward Burgess, of Camborne; the captain is John Prince; the London offices are 57 Old Broad street; the secretary is William Nicholson, Esq.

North Frances Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the mining district of Illogan. This mine is now worked for copper, and is situated bet seen Carn Brea and West Basset. The north part of the mine is granite, and the south part killas, traversed by several copper and tin lodes for about 600 fathoms in length. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 30-inch cylinder. This mine has been worked by a London company about four years, at an outlay of £12,500, and, in consequence of a recent discovery of rich copper ore, it is now selling at the rate of £30,000. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 2,500 shares. The purser is Thos. Garland, of Fairfield, Redruth.

North Levant Tin and Copper Mine, St. Just, Cornwall.

North Phoenix Mine is in the parish of Linkinhorne, Cornwall. It adjoins the Phoenix mine. There is a water-wheel for pumping, which is calculated to be of sufficient power to take the operations down 100 fathoms. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,000 shares. The secretary and purser is John Williams Dingle, Esq., of Henwood, Darley; the captain is John Martin, on the mine.

North Pool Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Lady Agar, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Hogan. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 2 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Pool, three-quarters of a mile from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lady Agar. The country is granite and plate. There has been a shaft sunk 100 fathoms. The mine is worked by steam-engines. The mine is now worked for copper, and drained by steam-power. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 200 shares, Operations were commenced in June, 1843, and since that time £62,200, or £311 per share, has been divided. For a considerable time the amount of dividend, every two months, was £1,000, or £5 per share. In 7854 £5,200 was divided. The purser is Henry Burrow, of Truro; the captain is James Evans.

North Roskear Mine is in the township and parish of Camborne, union of Redruth, Cornwall, and within the bounds of the manor of Roskear and Rosewarne. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Camborne, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are Portreath and Hayle, 2 and 6 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th and 1-20th, granted by Mrs. Pendarves, Mr. Enys, and John Francis Basset, Esq. The country is killas. The nearest granite is 1 mile distant. There are several known crosscourses. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 70-inch cylinder. The mine is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 140 shares. The dividends in 1851 were £4,270, or £30 10s. per share; in 1852, £1,470, or £10 10s. per share; in 1833, £2,800, or £20 per share. The whole amount of dividends paid from the commencement of the undertaking is £105,000. The purser is Thomas Darke, of Penzance; the manager is Capt. Joseph Vivian.

North Tamar Mine is in the parish of Lezant, union of Launceston, hundred of East, Cornwall. It is situated 4 miles from the market town of Launceston, 7 from Callington, 21 from Plymouth, and 268 From London. The nearest shipping place is at Cotehele quay, on the river Tamar, which is 111 miles from the mine. The mine was worked some years since under the name of Gresson Bridge Mine, but is now worked under the name of North Tamar Mine, by Henry Luke and others. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from Christmas, 1853, and granted by Mr. Symons, of Lezant. One engine-shaft has been sunk 20 fathoms deep; two crosscuts are driven east. There are five lodes running through the sett: four of them are lead lodes, and three dipping west, and one dipping east, 3 feet 6 inches in a fathom. There is also an east and west copper lode crossing the lead lodes, and a crosscourse running north and south, which crosses all the lodes. They are now preparing for the erection of a steam-engine for the purpose of again working the mine. The country is blue slate, dipping both east and west. The nearest granite is at Kit bill, 7 miles distant. The mine is divided into 4,096 shares, upon which 16s. per share has been paid. The agent and manager is Henry Luke, of Lawhitton, Launceston.

North Trelawny Lead Mine, Quethiock, Cornwall. N. Rickard, purser.

North Wheal Basset Copper and Tin Mine is in the parish of Illogan, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares. In 1855 the dividends were £21,750, or £3 12s 6d. per share. The secretary is J. Pascoe, of 50 Threadneedle street, London.

North Wheal Crofts Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Tehidy, and mining district of Illogan; it is situated 2 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath and Hayle, 3 and 6 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Pool, 1 mile from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by the late Baroness Basset, of Tehidy park. The country is slate-rock and greenstone, and the dip north. The nearest granite is at Cara Brea, three-quarters of a mile distant. There are several known lodes on the sett. The known crosscourses are three; two west and one east. There has been eight shafts sunk in the mine. The engine shaft is sunk 200 fathoms from the surface. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system. The purser is Thomas Darke, Esq., of Penzance; the captains are Joseph Vivian (manager), William Thomas, tied John Michell.

North Wheal Robert Copper Mine is in the parish of Sampford Spiney, near Tavistock, Devon. This mineral sett was in the hands of a local company some years ago. The present company consists of 1,024 shares, and was formed in 1850, and are now carrying out the work with spirit. The London offices are at 117 Bishopsgate street within, and the secretary is J. H. Murchison.

North Wheal Unity Mine is in the parish of Gwinear, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, and mining district of Gwinear; it is situated 34 miles from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 21 miles distant from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Gwinear, 14 miles distant from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by George Nutcombe Oxenham, Esq., of 61 Chancery lane, London. The country is killas, and the dip south-west. The nearest granite is at Crowan, miles distant. There are four known lodes on the sett. The known crosscourses are three of quartz, one of clay or flucan, and one of porphyry, which runs almost parallel with the lodes. There are six shafts sunk. The engine-shaft is sunk 66 fathoms below edit, or 78 fathoms from surface. The mine is drained by a steam-engine of 30-inch cylinder. The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, and lead. This mine was first opened in 1823. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 12,000 shares, with £1 paid, representing a capital of £12,000. The amount expended to the end of 1855 is about £11,000. The purser is Hugh Stephens, of Gwinear; the captain is William Medlin.

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Okehampton Consols Mine is in the parish of Okehampton, Devon; it is situated 2 miles from the town of Okehampton. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Morwellham, 17 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Copplestone Cross, 15 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1854, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the Rev. John Luxmoor. The country is clayslate, and the dip westward. The cleavage of the clayslate is rough and uneven. The nearest granite is 24 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are two: the lead lode runs north and south, and dips westward 1 foot in the fathom; it consists of gossan, quartz, and menthe. The copper lode runs east and west, and dips north 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of quartz, flucan, &c. There has been a shaft sunk 6 fathoms. The mine is worked by water-power. The minerals found in this sett include copper and lead. This mine was first opened in 1856, and was worked by the present company under the name of Okehampton Consols. The company is on she costbook system, and consists of 5,000 shares, with 2s. 6d. paid, representing a capital of £625. The purser is William E. Commins, of Tavistock; the captain is Joseph Richards. The London offices are 20 St. Helen's place; the secretary or agent is Henry Peet.

Okel Tor Mine is in the parish of Calstock, Cornwall. The mine is now worked for lead. The purser is John Bayly, of Plymouth; the captain is William B. Collom; the secretary is W. Channels, of Exeter.

Old Tolgus United Mine is in the township, parish, and union of Redruth, Cornwall, and within the bounds of the manor of Tolgus; it is situated half a mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, 270 from London. The nearest shipping, place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 21 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Richard Davey, of Redruth. The country is killas and ironstone. The known lodes on the sett are six, one of which runs east and west, and dips 14 feet south in the fathom; it consists of gossan, spar, peach, and mundic, and copper ore. There have been two shafts stink, one has been sunk 25 fathoms. The adit level is driven 80 fathoms on the course of the lode. The mine is drained by an edit. The minerals found in this sett include copper ore. This mine was first opened in 1855, and is now worked for copper ore by Messrs. Harvey and Co., under the name of Old Tolgus United. The purser is William Painter, of Hayle, Cornwall; the captain is James Thomas, of Redruth.

Old Wheal Basset Mine is in the township of Redruth, parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Nancekuke, and mining district of Redruth; it is situated 3.5 miles from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, 270 miles from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4 miles from the mine. The country is clayslate, and the dip westerly. The cleavage of the clayslate is almost flan The nearest granite is about 2 miles north. The principal known lodes on the sett are three:—The first lode runs 5° north of east, and dips 9 feet north in the fathom; it consists of caple and copper ore. The second lode runs nearly due east, and dips 9 feet north in the fathom; it consists of prian, quartz, end copper ore. The third lode runs 7° north of east, and dips 6 feet north in the fathom; it consists of caple, quartz, and copper ore. There have been three shafts sunk. The first working shaft is sunk 28 fathoms; the edit level is driven 50 fathoms. The second shaft is sunk 18 fathoms; the shallow adit level is driven 40 fathoms. The third shaft is sunk 40 fathoms; the edit level is driven 80 fathoms. The mine is drained by an edit. The minerals found in this sett include copper ore. The mine is now worked for copper. The produce in 1851 was 23 tons of copper ore; in 1852, 55 tons; in 1853, 311 tons; in 1834, 90 tons; in 1855, 117 tons. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares of £5 10s. each, all paid up, representing a capital of £1,408. The amount expended td end of December, 1855, is £3,328 6s. 6d. The purser is J. P. Bennetts, of Falmouth; the captain is Jos. Ninnis. The London offices are at 6 Queen street place; the managers are John Taylor and Sons.

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Par Consols Mine is in the parish of St. Blazey, Cornwall; it is situated in one of the richest mineral districts in the county, it being stated that the mines in its immediate neighbourhood (including Par Consols) have yielded copper ore of the value of £5,000,000 sterling, in the present century. The plant and machinery cost from £30,000 to £40,000. This twine is now worked for copper. Tile company is on the costbook system, and was originally in 123 shares; it now consists of 6,400 shares. The dividends in 1851 were £5,120, or lOs. per share; in 1852, £15,300, or £2 Ss. per share; in 1853, £4,800, or 15s. per share; 1854, £5,280, or 16s. 6d. per share; and in 1855, £3,840, or 12s. per share. The manager and captain is J. Puckey; the purser is Major Davis, R.M.; offices on the mine. The London agency is at 58 Old Broad street; the agent is William C. Foulkes.

Pedn-an-Drea United Mines are in the township, parish, and union of Redruth, and hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Trereiffe, and mining district of Redruth; it is situated in the town of Redruth; the name signifies the "Head of the Town," renowned for its extensive run of mines. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at Portreath, Hayle, and Devoran, distant respectively 3, 9, and 9 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is Redruth to each of the ports named, and 265 miles distant from London. The mine is held under leases for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-20th, granted by Lord Clinton, Mr. Pendarves, Mr. Collins, Mr. Roskrow, Hon. Mrs. Agar, — Basset, Esq., and others. The country is granite and clayslate, and the junction of these is within the limits thereof. The nearest granite hill is at Cam Brea and Carnmarth, half a mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are three, called Engine, Martin's, and Skimmer's; there are several others in the sett, which have been partially wrought. These three lodes, run from east to west through the entire length of the sett, have been extensively wrought as deep as the 70-fathom level, and yielded an immense amount of returns in tin, independent of copper ore and other minerals. The water has not been drawn out as yet to the bottom or 90-fathom level, nor can it be until a permanent and larger plunger lift now on the mine has been fixed at the 60-fathom level. The known crosscourses are the great crosscourses through Sparnon, yielding the finest quality of cobalt ever raised in England; also the middle and eastern crosscourse. There have been four shafts sunk; the engine shaft is sunk to 90 fathoms below adit. There are the following levels in this shaft—the 18, 36, 40, 47, 55, 60, 68 and 80 fathoms level; all but the last driven a considerable number of fathoms east and west; the latter very little, but now driving both ways. The Trevena's shaft is sunk to the 70-fathoms. There are the 18, 36, and levels down to the 70-fathom level in this shaft. The 70-fathom level east and west driven about 50 fathoms. The Street shaft is sunk to the 47-fathom level. There are the following levels in this shaft—the 18, 30, 40, and 47 fathom levels driven about 130 fathoms east and west. The Cobler's shaft is sunk to the 40-fathom level. There are the following levels in this shaft: the 10, 30, and 40 fathom levels, driven about 120 fathoms. There are sundry winzes between every shaft from level to level. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 75-inch cylinder for pumping, and 32-inch cylinder for stamping, with 48 heads on the north side, capable of working 48 more on the south side when required, and a 22-inch cylinder engine for winding, besides which is a complete calcining engine and burning-house stack nearly ready to go to work, when larger returns of tin will be made monthly; at present the yield is from 21 to 25 tons of block tin per month, of good quality. The dressing-floors are considered to be the most perfect in the county, well laid out upon the slope of the hill, down towards the turnpike road from Redruth to Falmouth. The mine is drained by a steam-engine 75-inch cylinder, with three boilers connected thereto. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper with cobalt and arsenic. This mine was first opened many years ago, and was worked by different companies under the name of Pedn-an-drea Mines. It is now worked for tin and copper ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 10,000 shares of £2 6s. each, all paid up, representing a capital of £23,000. The amount expended to the end of Feb.1856, is £28,722 10s. 9d. The amount received for tin sold in1854 amounted to£2800s.9d.; for 1855, £3,910 4s. id., copper ore £143 18s. Id., arsenic £63 04. 3d.; and to the 20th of March, 1856, arsenic £15 8s. 3d., tin £1,6571 s. making a total of £6,078 12s. 5d. The purser is W. Page Cardozo, of Redruth; the chief captains are John Delbridge and John Carpenter. The London offices are 3 Old Broad street; the secretary is Samuel Cardozo.

Pembroke and East Crinnis Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall; it is situated 2 miles from the town of St. Austell, and 250 from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Par, half a mile from the mine. The mine is held under leases for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-24th. It is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 37,000 shares. The purser is Mr. J. Stephen, of Charlestown; the captain is Mr. Dale. The London offices are at 27 Austinfriars, London; the secretary is Edward King.

Pencorse Consols Lead Mine, St. Enoder, Cornwall. John Champion. manager; Richard Tippett, resident agent; George Henwood, Esq., of Leeds, purser.

Pendarves and St. Aubyn Mine is in the parish of Camborne, Cornwall. This is the largest sett in the Camborne district, and has a great number of east and west lodes, with a large counter or cross lode. The ore is rich, and the mine is improving fast. The mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,000 shares. The purser is M. Kenworthy. The London offices are at 55 Old Broad street.

Pendeen Consols Copper and Tin Mines, St. Just, Cornwall. The depth of this mine is 40 fathoms. A steam-engine has been erected.

Penhaldarva Lead Mine, Kenwyn, Cornwall.

Pennance Consols Mining Company. W. Burgoin, secretary, 60 Gracechurch street, London.

Penstruthal Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manors of Lady E. R. Miller and Rev. James Blencowe, and mining district of Gwennap. It is situated 1 miles from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, 270 miles from London. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery is at Portreath, miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by Lady E. R. Miller and Rev. James Blencowe. The country is granite, and the dip eastern with south underlie. The cleavage of the clayslate is in the eastern part of the sett. The known lodes on the sett are four, one only of which has been worked to the 120-fathom level, and has yielded a profit to the adventurers of £75,000. Operations are recommenced, a 60-inch cylinder engine erected to drain the mine and sink under the old workings, in a large lode composed principally of mundic with fine stones of copper ore, and to drive crosscuts to open the side lodes which had been neglected by the former adventurers. The mine is now worked for copper. The purser is John Little, of Redruth; the captain is Thomas Pryor.

Penzance Consols Tin Mining Company. William Battye, secretary, 33 Great Winchester street, London.

Perran Wheal George Copper and Lead Mining Company. William Battye, secretary, 33 Great Winchester street, London.

Perran Wheal Zane Tin and Copper Mine, Perranzabuloe, Cornwall. William Battye, secretary, 33 Great Winchester street, London.

Phoenix Mine is in the parish of Linkinhorne, union of Liskeard, hundred of East Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Corneadonprior and duchy of Cornwall; it is situated 61 miles from the town of Liskeard. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Looe, 15 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the duchy of Cornwall. The mine, at the deepest point, is 175 fathoms below the surface. It is drained by steam-power. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 200 shares, with £30 paid, representing a capital of £6,000. The dividends in 1855 were £10,000, or £50 per share. The purser is Samuel Seccombe, on the mine.

Polberro Mine is in the parish of St. Agnes, union of Truro, hundred of Pydar, Cornwall, and within the bounds of the manor of Tywarnhayle, in the duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of St. Agnes; it is situated 9 miles from the town of Truro. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Trevaunance pier, adjoining the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Scorrier, 4 miles from the mine, and 266 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-25th, granted by the Duke of Cornwall and the Lords of Ty Tyas. The country is killas, and the dip south. The nearest granite is at Wheal Coates, 1 mile.

Polberro South Mine

(Underlie is the base of a perpendicular fathom.)

Tin Lodes. South House lode runs 3° north of east, underlie south, 2 feet in a fathom. Callow's lode runs 3° south of east, underlie south, 2 feet ditto. North House lode runs 4° south of east, underlie north, 11 feet ditto. Cly's lode runs 20° south of east, underlie north, 12 feet ditto. Trevaunance lode runs 20° south of east, underlie north, 12 feet ditto. Pye lode runs 22° south of east, underlie north, 14 feet ditto. Davies's lode runs 4° north of east, underlie north, 10 feet ditto

Old Polberro, or North Seal Hole Part.- Great copper lode runs east and west, underlie north,2 feet in a fathom. Buckingham lode runs 10° south of east, underlie south, 4 feet in a fathom. Great tin lode runs east and west, underlie south, 4 feet in a fathom. North tin lode runs 30° south of east, underlie north, 9 feet in a fathom.

The known crosscourses are two. Seal hole runs 25° east of south, underlie east, 2 feet in a fathom. Wheal Gentle runs 5° west of south perpendicular. (Levels reckoned from surface.)

Shafts. - Adit, 60 fathoms deep. Engine, 110 fathoms deep; 30, 60, 74, 80, 90, 95, and 105 fathom levels. Whittas's, 82 fathoms deep; 28. 35, 40, 50, 60, 67, 74. and 82 fathom levels. Vigers s, 110 fathoms deep; 24, 30,45, 60, 72, 80, 90, 100, and 110 fathom levels. Detastits's, 87 fathoms deep; 20, 60, 70, 76 and 87 fathom levels. East Pell, 100 fathoms deep; 60, 67, 80, 87, and 95 fathom levels. East, 90 fathoms deep; 50, 60, 67,72, 78, 85, and 90 fathom levels. Shop, 80 fathoms deep; 30, 40, 50, 60, 72, and 80 fathom levels. Wheal Gentle, 66 fathoms deep; 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50, 60, and 66 fathom levels. Park Sump, 120 fathoms deep; 50,60, 70, 80, 90, 95, 100, and 105 fathom levels. South Park, 80 fathoms deep; 30, 40, 50, 60, 65, and 80 fathom levels.

Old Polberro, Adit 43 fathoms deep.-Shafts:-Engine, 114 fathoms deep; 43, 53, 63, 73, 83, 88, 93, 103, and 114 fathom levels. Shop, 73 fathoms deep; 53, 63, and 73 fathom levels. North Seal Hole, 103 fathoms deep; 53, 63, 73, 83, 93, and 103 fathom levels. Humphery's, 93 fathoms deep; 53, 63, 73, 83, and 93 fathom levels.

Distastits's Shaft.-Extent of levels.-In 20-fathom level 20 fathoms on the lode; in 60-fathom level 20 fathoms on the crosscuts; in 70-fathom level 110 fathoms on the lode; in 76-fathom level 100 fathoms on the lode; in 87-fathom level 40 fathoms on the lode; in 87-fathom level 25 fathoms on the crosscut.

Park Shaft.-In 50-fathom level 30 fathoms on the lode; in 60-fathom level 200 fathoms on the rises and winzes, 80 fathoms on lode; in 70-fathom level 180 fathoms on the rises and winzes, 30 fathoms on lode; in 80-fathom level 100 fathoms on the rises and winzes, 40 fathoms on lode in 90-fathom leve1140 fathoms on the rises and winzes, 60 fathoms on lode; in 95-fathom level 70 fathoms on the rises and winzes, 20 fathoms on lode; in 100-fathom level 15 fathoms on lode; in 100-fathom level 40 fathoms on the crosscut; in 105-fathom level 6 fathoms on the lode.

The levels driven from the other shafts are extended almost the whole length of the mine, and being driven on numerous branches and flatcourses (besides the lodes named), cannot well be described. The length of the workings on the lodes is upwards of 400 fathoms, and the breadth of the workings more than 200 fathoms. The mine is worked by 4 steam-engines, viz., a 60-inch cylinder pumping-engine, a 36-inch stamping-engine (double acting), a 22 and 16-inch winding engines. The mine is drained by steam-power, at the rate of 200 gallons of water per minute. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper. This mine was opened probably more than 100 years ago, and was worked by several companies in small setts, under the name of Seal Hole, Wheal Kine, Wheal Park, East Pell, Old Polberro, &c. These setts were afterwards worked by a London company, under the name of the Royal Polberro Consols, and subsequently the St. Agnes Consolidated Mines. The mine is now worked for tin and copper. The produce in 1841 was 316 tons of tin ore, and 579 tons of copper ore; in 1852, 334 tons of tin ore, and 55 tons of copper ore; in 1853, 282 tons of tin ore; in 1824, 263 tons of tin ore and 11 tons of copper ore; in 1855, 261 tons of tin ore, and 5 tons of copper ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,000 (preferential) shares of £15 each, paid, representing a capital of £15,000. The dividends in 1851 were £1,750; in 1852, £1,216 13s. 4d.; in 1853, £3,283 6s. 8d.; in 1854, £2,525; and in 1855, £2,416 13s. 4d. The manager is John Taylor. jun., Esq., London; cashier, Mr. Michael Morcom, St. Agnes; captains, John Hancock and Nicholas Dunstan, St. Agnes; clerk, Thomas M. Ninnis; assayer, Richard Martin. London offices, 6 Queen street place, Southwark bridge.

Polmear Copper Mine, St. Austell, Cornwall. John Dalley, purser.

Poltimore Mine is in the township and parish of North Molton, union of South Molton, Devon; it is situated 61 miles from the town of South Molton. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery and nearest railway station is at Barnstaple, 12 miles from the mine, and 184 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-15th and £100 pet year sleeping rent to the lord of the manor, granted by Lord Poltimore, of Poltimore and North Molton. The country is hilly, and the dip west. The cleavage of the clayslate dips west and south. The nearest granite is at Lymouth, 12 miles. The slides dip east, west, and south. The known lodes on the sett are Poltimore and Bampfylde. The Poltimore lode runs east and west, and dips south about 3 feet in the fathom; it consists of micaceous, iron, and quartz, and grey sulphate of copper. The Bampfylde lode runs east and west, and dips south about 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of quartz and grey sulphate of copper. The known crosscourses are four, clayslate. There have been five shafts sunk. The No. 1 shaft is sunk 60 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:-The 20-fathom level is driven 120 fathoms; the 30-fathom level is driven 130 fathoms; the 40-fathom level is driven 70 fathoms; the 60-fathom level is driven 10 fathoms south. The No. 2 shaft is sunk 60 fathoms. There is the following level in this shaft:-The 20-fathom level is driven 20 fathoms. The No. 3 shaft is sunk 70 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: The 20-fathom level is driven 30 fathoms; the 30-fathom level is driven 50 fathoms. The No. 4 shaft is sunk 20 fathoms. There is the following level in this shaft: -The 20-fathom level is driven 20 fathoms. The No. 5 shaft is sunk 10 fathoms. The mine is worked by water-power. The wheel is 50 feet in diameter, 5 feet breast in water, and 5 feet stroke. The mine is drained by a 16-inch bucket, 12-inch plunger, and 101-inch bucket. The minerals found in this sett include grey sulphate of copper and yellow sulphate. This mine was first opened in 1852, and was worked by Mr. William Washington Mansell, under the name of the Poltimore Mitre. It was afterwards worked by Charles Henage, Esq., under the name of Poltimore Gold Mine. It is now worked for copper. The produce in 1852 was 15 tons of ore; and in 1855, 8 tons of ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 18,500 shares of Et each, all paid up, representing a capital of £18.500. The agent is Edwin Maunder, of Heasley Mill, North Molton, Devon; the purser is H. C. Croft, Esq., of London; the captain is Matthew Floyd. The London offices are 21 King street, St. James'.

Porkellis United Tin Mines, Wendron, Cornwall. The purser is David Grafton Goatley, 31 Threadneedle street, London.

Prideaux Wood Mine is in the parish of Luxulyan, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,400 shares. The manager is Captain J. Puckey; the purser is Major Davis, R.M.; offices on the mine. The London agent is William C. Foulkes, 58 Old Broad street.

Prince Ernest Tin Mine, Bodmin, Cornwall. David Grafton Goatley, purser, 31 Threadneedle street, London.

Providence Mines are in the parish of Uny Lelant, union of Madron, hundred of West Penwith, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Uny Lelant; situate 2 miles from the town of Sr. Ives. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at St. Ives and Hayle, 2 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Hayle, 2 miles from the mine, and 272 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years. The country is granite and greenstone. The known lodes on the sett are very numerous, some running east and west, and a few north and south. The machinery consists of one steam-engine for pumping and stamping, and one for winding. The mine is drained by steam-power: The minerals found in this sert include tin, copper, and pitch blende. This mine was first opened 200 years ago, or more. This mine is now worked for prefix. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 560 shares ofE20 13s. 2d. each, all paid, representing a capital expended by adventurers of £11,569 8s. ld.; the total amount expended by adventurers, and produce of the mines to end December, 1855, is £183,003 I4s. Id.; the dividends, in 1851, were £1,680, or £3 per share; in 18,-.3, £840, or £1 108. per share; 1851,1980, or El 15s. per share; in £1855, £6,300, or £11 5s. per share; and in February, 1856, £2,800, or £5 per share; total amount of dividends made, £40 per share. The purser is Mr. Samuel Higgs, of Penzance; the Captain is Philip Dunstan, Lelant.

Q

Queen of Dart Copper Mine, Summerhill, Ashburton, Devon.

R

Restormel Royal Iron Mine is in the township of Lostwithiel, the parish, of Lanlivery, union of Bodmin, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Restormel, and duchy of Cornwall; it is situated half a mile from the town of Lostwithiel, which is rise nearest railway station, 270 miles from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Fowey, 6 miles from the mine by lighters down the river Fowey. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the duchy of Cornwall to Messrs. John Taylor and Sons of London. The country is slate, and the dip east. The nearest granite is at Lanlivery, 1 mile distant. There is one lode, which runs north and south, and dips I toot in the fathom; it consists of iron, quartz, flucan, &c. There are no known crosscourses. All the workings are above the deep adit, and all ores, &c., brought out by horses over railroads through the said add. The mine is drained by a deep adit. This mine was first opened and worked by Mr. Adam Thompson, under the name of Restormel Mine; it was afterwards worked by Messrs. John Taylor and Son., under the name of the Restormel Royal Iron Mine Company. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 48 shares of £227 18s. 4d. each, with £227 181. 4d. paid, representing a capital of £10,920. The dividends in 1854 were £3,610 13s.11d., or £75 per share; and in 1855, £2,880, or £60 per share. The purser is John P. Bennetts, of Falmouth; the captain is William Cook. The London offices are at 6 Queen street place, Upper Thames street; and the managers, John Taylor and Sons.

Robin's Tin and Copper Mine, St. Neots, Cornwall. The London office is at 13 George yard, Lombard street, and the secretary is J. Watson.

Rocks and Treverbyn United Tin Mine is in the parish of Roche, Cornwall. The London offices are at 55 Old Broad street; the secretary is M. Kenworthy.

Rosewarne United Mine is in the parish of Gwinear, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Roseworthy, Clowance, and Rosewarne, and mining district of Gwinear. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 3 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Gwinear road, three quarters of a mile from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by H. N. St. Aubyn, W. Huthnance, and Mrs. Hartley. The country is killas, and the dip southwest. The nearest granite is at Crowan, 1 mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are six. The Wheal Bush lode runs south-east and north-west; it consists of copper, and a small quantity of tin. The known crosscourses are two elvan, and runs parallel with the lode, and two spar crosscourses. There has been one shaft sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 73 fathoms from surface. The mine is worked and drained by steam-engines of 40 and 65 inch cylinders. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine was first opened in 1696, and was worked again in 1836. It is now worked by the present adventurers under the name of Rosewarne United. The produce in 1855 was 1,594 tons of ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares. The dividends in 1855, were £7,936, or £31 per share. The purser is William Huthnance, of Rosewarne; the captains are Henry Woolcock, Edward Carthew, and Edward Blewett.

S

St. Austell Consols Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. The minerals found in this sett include nickel, cobalt, and tin. The mine is 60 fathoms in depth. The purser is Richard Williams. The London offices are at 1 Church court, Clement's lane, City; the secretary is S. Heath, jun.

St. Day United Mines are in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of St. Day, and milling district of Gwennap; it is situated 3 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at Portreath and Devoran, 6 miles from the mitre, and the nearest railway station is at Scorrier, 11 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-24th, granted by the lords of St. Day manor, and is drained by steam-power. The country is killas, and the dip east. The mine is worked by four steam-engines. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mitre was first worked under the name of Poldice, Wheal Maiden, Wheal Unity, East Wheal Maiden, Wheal Gorland, and part of Wheal Jewell; it was afterwards worked under the name of St. Day United. The purser is Mr. Francis Pryor, of Redruth; the captain is William Jeague.

St. Ives Consols Tin Mine, St. Ives, Cornwall.

Sidney Mine is in the parishes of Plympton St. Mary and Shaugh Prior, Devon, and mining district of Plympton; it is situated 7 miles from the town of Ply mouth, which is the nearest shipping place for ores and machinery. The nearest railway station is at Plympton, 2 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by George Strode, Esq., of Newnham. The country is slate, and the dip north. The nearest granite is at Dartmoor, 1 mile distant. There has been one shaft sunk 45 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by water-power,--a wheel 44 feet diameter, 4 feet wide. The minerals bound in this sett include tin and a little copper. This mine was first opened in 1850, but was worked, it is supposed, over 300 years since. This mine is now worked for tin. The produce in 1852 was £1,095 I 1 s. 61.; in 1853, £3,261 16s. 61.; in 1854, £1,930 11s. 6d.; and to October,1855, £2,170 4s. 2d. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares, with Ed 12s. 6d. paid, representing a capital of £8,832. The purser is H. E. Croker, of Plymouth; the captain is W. Edwards, Colebrook, Plympton.

Silver Brook Lead Mine, Ilsington, Devon. J. H. Murchison, secretary, 117 Bishopsgate street within, London.

Sithney Wheal Buller Tin Mine, Sithney, near Helston, Cornwall. Purser and secretary, J. Fairweather, 6A, Belvedere road, Lambeth, London.

Sortridge and Bedford Mine is in the township and parish of Whitchurch, union and hundred of Tavistock, Devon, within the mining district of Tavistock; it is situated 21 miles south of the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Morwellham, 3 wiles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 12 miles from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by William Courtenay, Esq., of Woodmancote, Hants. The country is killas, and the dip south. There is granite in the neighbourhood. The known lodes on the sett are several. The known crosscourses are four. There has been a shaft sunk 30 fathoms. The engine-shaft is sunk 16 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a waterwheel. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper. This mine was first opened and worked by a London company, under the name of West Down, for tin; it was afterwards worked by a London company, under the name of Sortridge and Bedford. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 12,000 shares. The purser is W. B. Harvey, of Tavistock; the captain is Thomas Treweek. The London offices are at 20 St. Helen's place, Bishopsgate street; the secretary or agent is Henry Peet.

South Bedford Consols Mining Company. G. Kieckhoefer, secretary, 50 Threadneedle street, London.

South Caradon Copper Mine is in the parish of St. Cleer, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares. The dividends in 1855 were £12,288, or £48 per share. The purser is T. Kittow, of Liskeard.

South Carn Brea Copper and Lead Mine, Illogan, Cornwall. The secretary is J. Pascoe, of 50 Threadneedle-street, London.

South Crenver Mine is in the parish of Crowan, union of Helston, hundred of Kerrier, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Crenver, and mining district of Crowan; it is situated 5 miles from the town of Camborne, which is the nearest railway station, 275 from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 6 miles distant. The mine is held under leases for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-18th and 1-25th, granted by Mrs. Mary Hartley and Mrs. Johanna Millett, of Camborne and Marazion. The country is clayslate, and the dip west, close to junction with granite and large elvan course. The nearest granite is at Cernmenelis, 3 miles distant. Small patches of granite are expected in the eastern part of the sett. There is a flucan westward, dipping west. The known lodes on the sett are three, viz.: Engine lode, Golden Arrow, and another. The Engine lode runs through the sett and dips 21 feet south in the fathom; it consists of copper and sulphuric mundic. The Golden Arrow lode runs similar, and but little workings upon it; it consists of copper and mundic. The known crosscourses are the great elvan, 9 fathoms wide. The edit. or sea level, 17 fathoms from surface. There have been four shafts sunk; the flat rod shaft is sunk 106 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: the 12, 24, 34 and 44 fathom levels, driven 150 fathoms from east to west; the 54, 64, and 74, about 160; the 84 about 70 fathoms, and the 94 about 30. The engine-shaft is sunk 76 fathoms below adit, and sinking towards the 84. The Gores shaft is sunk to the 74-fathoms level. There are the following levels in this shaft-the above, to 74-fathom level, driven east to said shaft; and the 84 driving towards it. The Chambers shaft is sunk to adit, or sea level. This is the only level in this shaft. Several winzes have been holed through from level to level between flat-rod, engine, and Gore shaft. From flat-rod east to Gore shaft is about 100 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 70-inch cylinder of 12 feet stroke, under the superintendence of Mr. West, the engineer. The lode in lbs. 41,000, and 101bs. per square inch on the piston, about three strokes a minute, equal to 43 horse power, consuming 75 tons of coal per month, drawing perpendicularly 80 fathoms, and about 30 on the diagonal, main-beam over the cylinder, two balance-bobs, and 75 fathoms of flat rods at surface, and 85 fathoms of dry rods under ground, with two boilers of 12 tons each. There is also a 22-inch winding-engine for drawing and crushing copper ore. The minerals found in this sett include copper. The mine was first opened and worked many years ago by a Cornish company. It was afterwards worked by the late Capt. Thomas Teague and others. The present company commenced working July 1st, 1851. This mine is now worked for copper ore. The produce in 1853 was £2.734 Os. 3d. copper ore; in 1854, £5,176 9s. 9d.; in 1855, £8,091 13s. 11d.; total, £13,268 3s. 8d. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,000 shares of £3 19s. 8d. each, paid, representing a capital of £19,915. The amount expended to end of December, 1855, is £34,939 lls. 2d. The purser is W. Page Cardozo, of Crowan; the chief captain is John Delbridge. The London offices are 3 Old Broad street; the secretary is Samuel Cordozo.

South Crinnis Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. It is bounded on the north by West Crinnis, on the south by the sea, on the east by Great Crinnis, and on the west by Wheal Polmeer. The mine is now worked for copper In 1855 1,772 tons of ore were sold, realising £13,843 9s. 6d. The company consists of 128 shares; the dividends in 1855 were £7,680, or £60 per share. The purser is J. Petherick, of St. Austell; the captain is Francis Barrett.

South Devon Great Consols Copper Mine, Calstock, Cornwall. George Angus, secretary, 10a, King's Arm's yard, Coleman street, London,

South Dolcoath and Camarthen Consols Mine is in the parish of Illogan, Cornwall. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by Sir Richard R. Vyvyan, Bart., of Bonython. The following is taken from Capt. Roberts's report, dated December 26, 1855:-" The 60 fathom level crosscut is driven 27 fathoms north of the engine-lode; the ground continues favourable. The 50 is extended 60 fathoms east of shaft; in the present end the lode is 5 feet wide, composed of prian and spar. In driving the same level west the lode in the last 6 fathoms has greatly improved, being now 6 feet. wide, letting out a large stream of water, and occasionally producing good stones of ore. This end is 108 fathoms west of the engine shaft, without any appearance of the crosscourse we expect to cut. In the 40 fathom level east the lode is 4 feet wide containing prian and spar. In the edit east of Brea Valley the lode is 6 in. wide, producing stones of ore. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares. The purser is Richard Lyle, of Redruth; the captain is James Roberts; the London offices are at 50 Threadneedle Street; the secretaries are Messrs. Morris and Buckley.

South Frances Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of East Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Tehidy, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Illogan. It is situated 21 miles from the towns of Camborne and Redruth, and 2 from Pool. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 5 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Pool, l& miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1843, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the late Baroness Basset, of Tehidy Park, and the Rev. H. M. St. Aubyn, of Clowance. The country is granite, and the dip of the clayslate is northward. The known lodes on the sett are seven. The Boundary lode runs 15° north of east and south of west, magnetic, and dips southward in the fathom 2 feet; it consists of flucan, quartz, and grey copper ore. The New North lode rues east and west, and dips southward in the fathom 15 inches; it consists of chlorite, fluor spar, and yellow copper ore. The North lode runs east and west, and dips north in the fathom 15 inches; it consists of chlorite and yellow copper ore. Basset's lode runs east and west, and dips northward 18 inches in the fathom; it consists of quartz, flour spar, chlorite, iron, tin, and copper ore-native, black, grey, and yellow, Little's lode runs 7° north of east and south of west, and dips south 18 inches in the fathom; It consists of gossan, prian, iron, and grey copper ore. Rule's lode runs east and west, and dips south 18 inches in the fathom; it consists of quartz, flucan, and tin and copper Ares in small quantities. Williams's lode runs east and west, and dips north 1 foot in the fathom; it consists of quartz, prime cosset), and small quantities of copper ore. There have been 7 shafts sunk. Marriott's engine-shaft is sunk 154 fathoms under the atilt, 22 fathoms from surface. There are the following levels in this shaft:-154, 144, 134, 124, 114, 104, 94, 82, 70, 60, 50, 40, 30, and adit. Broad's shaft is sunk 134 fathoms under adit. There are the following levels in this shaft:-134, 124, 114, 104, 94,82,70,60, 50, 40,30, and adit. Pryor's shaft is sunk 134 fathoms under the add. There are the following levels in this shaft:-134, 124, 104, 91, 82, 70, 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, and adit. Wheal Noble shaft is sunk 40 fathoms under edit. There are the following levels in this shaft:-40, 30, and edit. Richard's shaft is sunk 52 fathoms under surface, not yet communicated to any level. This is designed for the principal drawing-shaft on the New North lode, which is at present the most productive lode. Rule's shaft is sunk 50 fathoms under edit. There are the following levels in this shaft: -50 and 30. Harvey's engine-shaft is sunk 65 fathoms under adit. There are the following levels in this abaft -65, 55, 45, 30, 15, and edit. Engine now idle. The known crosscourses ate six-flucan with a small leade of quartz. Basset's is heaved 2 feet to the right hand; Rule's 2 fathoms. The other lodes are heaved from 2 feet to 6 feet in the same direction. In the 30-fathom level in Bassett's lode one of these crosscourses is heaved about 3 feet by the lode. The mine is worked and drained by a 75-inch cylinder pumping-engine, 11 feet stroke in-doors, and 9 feet in the shaft. There is a drawing engine, 24-inch cylinder, also working an ore-crusher, with rolls of 30-inch diameter, and five water stamping-mills. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. The mine was first opened about 1820, and was worked by Cornish adventurers, under the name of South Wheal Frances. It was afterwards worked by the present adventurers, under the same name. The mine is now worked for copper and tin. The produce in 1851 was 2,698 tons of copper ore, and 62 tons of tin; in 1852, 2,500 tons of copper ore, and 39 tons of tin; in 1853, 2,651 tons of copper ore, and 27 tons of tin; in 1854, 2,806 tons of copper ore, and 22 tons of tin'; in 1855, 4,569 tons of copper ore, and 20 tons of tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 496 shares of £18 184. 9d. each, all paid up, representing a capital of £9,392 164. l Id. The dividends in 1851 were £10,416, or £21 per share; in 1852, £6,696, or £13 l Os. per share; in 1853, £6,076, or £12 54. per share; in 1854, £7,440, or £15 per share; and in 1855, £19,964, or £40 5s. per share. Dividends have been paid hi-monthly since October, 1846; total to end of 1855, £84.506. There is a committee of management. The purser is John Cady, of Pool; the managing captain is William Pascoe, of Camborne; the captains are William Bishop and Joseph Prisk; clerk, William H. Pascoe; superintendent of ore dressing, John Rule; superintendent of tin dressing, Josiah Blight.

South Garras Lead Mine, Kenwyn, Cornwall.

South Maria Mine, which includes the minerals under the Tamar river, is in the parish of Calstock, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Calstock, and mining district of Callington, and adjoins the well-known Devon Great Consols Mines, which in eleven years has returned upwards of £450,000 profit to the fortunate adventurers, the lodes of which run through this sett. It is situated 4 miles from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock quay, 24 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 18 miles from the mine, and 264 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-15111, granted by Mr. William Stephens, of Latchly, Calstock, and the minerals under the Tamar river from the Duke of Cornwall, by lease 9th July, 1855, for 21 years. The country is killas, and the dip of the same north and south. The nearest granite is at Whitrocks, 1 mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are two. The No. 1 lode runs east and west, and dips north 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of killas, spar, mundic, and copper ore. The No. 2 lode runs east and west, and dips south 21 feet in the fathom; it consists of spar, mundic, and caple. The Shop Shaft lode runs east and west, and dips south 11 feet in the fathom; it consists of gossan, spar, mundic, and copper. There are two crosscourses running nearly north and south, composed of spar. There have been two shafts sunk; 46 fathoms, and 8 fathoms. The ermine-shaft is sunk 46 fathoms. The 28-fathom level is driven 44 fathoms on the course of the lode. There are the following crosscuts from this shaft: -the 28-fathom level crosscut, driven 36 fathoms; and the 40-fathom level crosscut, driven 16 fathoms. The Shop shaft is sunk 8 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a water-wheel 12 feet high and 12 feet wide. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened in 1844, and was worked by George Croker Fox and others under the name of Tincroft; it was afterwards and is still worked by Thomas Bartlett, Esq., under the name of South Maria. The mine is now worked for copper. The purser and captain is William Rowe, of Callington. The London offices are at 36, Lombard street; the secretary and owner is Thomas Bartlett, Esq.

South Phoenix Copper and Tin Mining Company, Henry Heane, secretary, Carlton chambers, 12 Regent street, London.

South Providence Mine is in the parish of Uny Lelant, town of Madron, hundred of West Penwith, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Lelant, It is situated 3 miles from the town of St. Ives. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at St. Ives and Hayle, 3 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Hayle, 3 miles from the mine, and 272 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years. The country is granite. There are several known lodes on the sett. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 80 h.p. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper ore. This mine is now worked for profit. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 100 shares of £2210s. each, representing a capital of £2,250. The purser is Mr. Samuel Higgs, of Penzance; the captain is Richard James, Lelant.

South Rosewarne Copper Mine, Gwinear, Cornwall. It adjoins the Rosewarne United, and is divided into 2,560 shares.

South Tamar Consols Lead Mines are in the parish of Beerferris, Devon. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 9,000 shares. The machinery is said to be worth £15,000. In 1852, 1853, and 1854, the dividends amounted to £20,250, or £2 5s. per share. The manager is J. Wolferstan; the secretary is G. Kieckhoefer, of 50 Threadneedle street, London.

South Wheal Crofty Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of East Penwith, Cornwall; within the bounds of the manor of Tehidy, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Camborne, from which it is one mile. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at Portreath and Hayle, 3 and 6 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Pool, half a mile from the mine, and 260 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by Lady Basset, W. B. Praed, Esq., Sir R. B. Vyvyan, and the Hon. Mrs. Agar. The country is killas, porphyry, and ironstone, and the dip north. The nearest granite is half a mile south. The known lodes on the sett are three. The main lode runs north-west, and dips 1 foot south in the fathom; it consists of copper. There have been 14 shafts sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 125 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft; the adit, 12, 24, 35, 45, 55, 70, 80, 100, 115 and 125 fathom levels. The mine is worked by two steam-engines. This mine is now worked for copper, and is drained by steam-power. The purser is Edward Hearle Rodd, of Penzance; the captain is William Rutter.

South Wheal Robert Mine is in the township and parish of Sampford Spiney, union and hundred of Tavistock, Devon, and mining district of Devon. It is situated 31 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Tavistock wharf, 31-miles distant from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 101 from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Sir Massey Lopes, and another, of Mariston. The country is killas. The nearest granite is at Walkhampton, half a mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are three, copper; the known crosscourses are two, composed of flucan, spar, and gossan. A shaft is now in course of sinking and croseteaning. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened in 1855, and worked by a London company, under the name of South Wheal Robert. The mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 12,000 shares. The purser is W. B. Harvey, of Tavistock; the captain is Thomas Cocking. The London offices are 13 George yard, Lombard street; the secretary or agent is John Watson.

South Wheal Tolgus Mine is in the township, parish and union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Tolgus, and mining district of Redruth. It is situated three-quarters of a mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, 264 miles from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 24 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1847, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by J. W. Buller, Esq., of Downes, Devon. The country is elate, and the dip west; the cleavage of the clayslate is west and north. The nearest granite is one mile. The known lodes on the sett are four. The south lode rims 6° south of east, and dips north in the fathom 2 feet; it consists of copper, quartz, and tin. The north lode runs 6° north of east, end dips north in the fathom 3 feet; it consists of copper and quartz. The Youren's lode rut s about east and west, and dips north in the fathom one foot; it consists of copper and quartz. The known crosscourses are three, and consist of flucan and quartz, slate and ironstone. There have been four shafts sunk. The main shaft is sunk 130 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft- the 100, 90, 78, 60, 54, 40, 32, 22 and 12 fathom levels are driven 185, 290, 260, 330, 290, 250, 215, 70, and 18 fathoms, and the edit driver, 450 fathoms. Morcom's shaft is sunk 70 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft the 40, 32, 22, and 10 fathom levels are driven 25, 110, 120 and 72 fathoms. The north shaft is sunk 40 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft—the 10 fathom and edit levels are driven 25 and 70 fathoms. The new shaft is sunk 30 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by steam-engines of 42 and 32 inch cylinders. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine was first opened in 1845, and was worked by and under the name of South Wheal Tolgus. The produce in 1851 was 2,4201 tons of ore; in 1852, 2,4834 tons of ore; in 1853, 2,494.1 tons of ore; in 1854, 1,5034 tons of ore; in 1855, 1,21S3 tons of ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares of £16 each, with £16 paid, representing a capital of £4,096. The amount expended to December, 1855, is £68,800 14s. lid. The dividends in 1851 were £4,224, or£16 10s. per share; in 1852, £5,888, or £23 per share; in 1853, £2,304, or £9 per share. The purser is Tobias Mitchell, of Redruth; the captain is Joseph Jewell. The London offices are at 6 Queen street place, Upper Thames street. Managers, Messrs. John Taylor and Sons.

South Wheal Yeoland Tin and Copper Mine, Buckland Monachorum, Devon. The office is at St. Andrew's place, Plymouth.

South Zion Mine is east of the town of Calstock, Cornwall, and adjoining the river Tamar. This mine was started in 1855, and is divided into 4,000 shares. The purser is Joseph Hodge, of Gunnislake. The London offices are at 20 St. Helen's place, and the secretary is Henry Peet.

Spearne Consols Mine is in the parish of St. Just, union of Penzance, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Just. It is situated 6 miles from the town of Penzance, which is the nearest shipping place and railway station, 287 miles from London. The mine 11 held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-24th The prospects in the bottom levels are good for tin, and it is probable that dividends may soon be resumed. The mine is worked by steam-engines of 24 and 20 inch cylinders, water-power, &c. This mine commenced in 1839, since which period it has paid in dividends £9,408, upon an outlay of £1,280. This mine is now worked for tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. The purser is Richard Pearce, of Penzance.

Spearne Moor Mine is in the parish of St. Just, in Penwith, union of Madron, hundred of West Penwith, Cornwall, within the duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of St. Just. It is situated 7 miles from the town of Penzance, which is the nearest shipping place for ores and machinery. The nearest railway station is at Penzance, 7 miles from the mine, and 287 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 14 years. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 280 shares of £23 7s. 9d. each, all paid, representing a capital expended by adventurers of £6,547 16s. 2d. The total amount expended to the end of September, 1855, by adventurers and produce of the mine, is £31,962 8s. 9d. The dividends in 1855 were £1,050, or £3 15s. 0d. per share. The purser is Mr. Samuel Higgs, of Penzance; the captain is Nicholas Hocking, St. Just.

Stoke Climsland Consols Mine is in the township and parish of Stoke Climsland, union of Launceston, hundred of East, Cornwall, within the bounds of the Duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Callington. It is situated 5 miles from the town of Callington, and 7 from Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock, 7 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 20 from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by II.R.H. the Duke of Cornwall. The country is clayslate, and the dip east. The cleavage of the clayslate is east. The nearest granite is at Kitt Hill, 31 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are two. The copper lode runs east and west, and dips north 3 feet in the fathom underlie; it consists of gossan, mundic, peach, prian, and quartz. The lead lode runs east and west, and dips north 4 feet in the fathom underlie; it consists of silver-lead, sulphur, mundic, flucan, and caple. There are no known crosscourses. There has been one shaft sunk 47 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The 18-fathom level is driven 50 fathoms on the copper and 30 fathoms on the lead lode. The edit level is driven 110 fathoms on the copper lode. The 30-fathom level is driven 40 fathoms on the copper and 30 on the lead lode. The 42-fathom level is driven 12 fathoms on the copper lode. There are crosscuts at the adit level driven 15 fathoms, and at the 18-fathom level driven 12 fathoms, and at the 30-fathom level driven 13 fathoms, and at the 42-fathom level driven 10 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 24-inch cylinder. The minerals found in this sett include copper and silver-lead. This mine was first opened in 1851, and was worked by the Stoke Climsland Consols Mining Company, under the name of Richard Gard and Co., and it still continues to be worked by the same parties. This mine is now worked for copper and silver-lead ores. The purser is Mr. Edward Gard, of Castle street, Exeter; the captain is Matthew Stephens.

Stray Park and Camborne Vean Mines are in the township of Camborne, the parish of Camborne, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the hounds of the manor or lordship of J. F. Bassett, C. A. Reynolds. Sir R. R. Vyvyan, and mining district of Camborne. They are situated half a mile from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 6 miles from the mines, and the nearest railway station is at Camborne, a quarter of a mile from the mines. The mines are held under leases for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-18th and 1-24th, granted by the above mentioned persons. Granite is on the mines, at a depth of 212 fathoms below adit of 30 fathoms. The known lodes on the sett are four:—The Camborne Vean Old South lode runs east and west, and dips 15 inches in the fathom; it consists of copper. The Stray Park main lode runs east and west, and dips 15 inches in the fathom; it consists of copper. The South main lode runs east and west, and dips 18 inches in the fathom; it consists of copper and tin. The Town lode underlies south about 14 inches in the fathom, and consists principally of copper. The known crosscourses are three, and consist principally of flucan and mundic, iron and spar. There have been eight shafts sunk. The Camborne Vean engine-shaft is sunk 212 fathoms below edit. There are about every 10 fathoms levels in this shaft. The 212-fathom level is driven about 6 fathoms. The 200-fathom level is driven about 60 fathoms. The mines are worked and drained by a steam-engine of 60-inch cylinder. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. These mines are now worked for copper and tin. The produce in 1851 was 934 tons of ore, value £3,500; in 1852, 591 tons of ore or metal, value £2,541; in 1853, 1,206 tons of ore, value £6,400; in 1854, 772 tons of ore or metal, value £4,780; in 1855, 690 tons of ore, value £3,415. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,000 shares, with £6 7s. 50. paid, representing a capital of £6,372 18s. 4d. expended before dividend declared. The total amount expended to 1855 is £14,165. The dividends six years previous to 1851 were £11,000, or £11 per share. The purser is Wm. Vawdrey, of Hayle; the captain is Richard Pryor.

Swanpool Mine is in the parish of Budock, union of Falmouth, hundred of East Kerrier, Cornwall, and mining district of Falmouth. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Falmouth, which is the nearest shipping place for ores and machinery. The nearest railway station is at Devoran, 6 miles from the mine, and '264 from London. The mine is held under leases for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the trustees of Lord Wodehouse, Dr. Richards, and R. B. Fox, deceased. The country is killas, and the dip south; the cleavage of the clayslate is south; the nearest granite is at about 1 mile distant. The main lode is intersected by a crosscourse and several small flucans. The Swanpool lode runs 10° to the north of east, and dips south 18 inches in the fathom; it consists of lead (where profitable), mixed with mundic, spar, and flucan. There are other lodes to the north, but untried. The known crosscourse is one, flucan and spar. There have been five shafts sunk. The engine-shaft is studs 80 fathoms from the surface. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The 80-fathom level is driven 5 fathoms; the 70-fathom level is driven 60 fathoms; the 60-lathom level is driven 100 fathoms; the 50-fathom level is driven 130 fathoms; the 40-fathom level is driven 140 fathoms; the 30-fathom level is driven 130 fathoms; the 20-fathom level is driven 50 fathoms. The whim shaft is sunk 40 fathoms from the surface. The footway shaft is sunk 40 fat bows from the surface. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 40-inch cylinder. There is a steam whim-engine, which works to draw stuff and crushes the ores. The mine is drained by n 50 h.p. engine. The minerals found in this sett include lead, silver, tin, mundic, &c. The produce in 1852 was 400 tons of metal; in 1855, 500 tons of metal. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,800 shares, £8 per share having been paid. The amount expended to 1855, is about £23,000. The purser is Francis Todd, Esq., of Falmouth; the captain is Jas. Trewren.

T

Tamar Consols Silver-Lead Mine, Beeralston, Devon. In 1853, the dividends were £19,200. or £2 per share. The secretary is Frederick George, 17 Gresham street, London.

Tehidy Copper Mine, Illogan, Cornwall. J. Pascoe, secretary, 50 Threadneedle street, London.

Tincroft Mine is in the township and parish of Illogan, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Camborne. It is situated 2 miles from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 12 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Pool, one-eighth of a mile from the mine, and 70 from Plymouth. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by Mrs. Anna Maria Agar, of Redruth. The country is killas. The mine is now worked for copper and tin. The London offices are at 61 Moorgate street; the secretary is H. Williams.

Tokenbury Copper Mine, St. Ive, Cornwall. E. A. Crouch, purser; R. Dunstan, captain; M. Loam, engineer.

Treasury United Mine is in the parishes of Crowan and Gwinear, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Rev. H. M. St. Aubyn. It is situated 4 miles from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 5 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Gwinear road, 2 from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by the Rev. H. M. St. Aubyn. The purser is Thomas Richards, of Hayle; the captains are William Rosewarne, and John Lean.

Treburgett Crowan Consolidated Mine, Crowan Cornwall. William Evans, secretary, 9 Austinfriars, London.

Trefusis Mine is in the township, parish, and union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Lord Clinton and others, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Redruth. It is situated half a mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 34 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 dears, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lord Clinton and others. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The parser is Thomas Richards, of Hayle; the captain is Zechariah Carkeek.

Tregune Consols Copper and Tin Mine, Altarnun, Cornwall. John Rowe, captain; John Spargo, purser; Amos Chapman, engineer

Tregwollans Iron Mine is in the parish of St. Stephen, Cornwall. The depth of the mine is 30 fathoms; the proprietor is Joseph Morcom.

Trehane Lead Mine, Menheniot, Cornwall. Thomas Woolcock, captain. In 1853 and 1854 the amount divided was £4,096. The mine is worked by steam-power. The London offices are at 16 Union court, Old Broad street. The secretary is Robert Daly.

Treleigh Consols Mine is in the township, parish, and union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Treleigh, duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Redruth. It is situated miles from the town of Redruth, which is the neatest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 2 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1854, at a royalty of 1-14th, granted by Messrs. Garden, Chadwick, Bridgeman, and party. The country is slate, and the dip is 75° south-east; the cleavage of the clayslate is therefore nearly north and south. The nearest granite is at Carn Brea, 3 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are three: — The Good Fortune lode runs 7° north-west and south-east, and dips south 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of quartz and yellow copper ore. The Stranger lode rues 12° north-west and south-east, and dips 18 inches in the fathom north; it consists of quartz and hornstone, with yellow and grey copper ore. The Nicholson's lode runs 15° north-west and south-east, and dips 1 foot in the fathom north; it consists of white quartz, accompanied by copper pyrites and oxide of tin. The known crosscourses are two— the great crosscourse consists of friable quartz, and the little crosscourse, 70 fathoms ascent, of felspar clay; they both dip easterly, and traverse 10° east of north and west of south. There have been four shafts sunk— the Garden's shaft is sunk 150 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft—the 10, 20, 30, 40, 50,60,70, SO, 90, 100, 110, and 125 fathom. The Carrs' shaft is sunk 40 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft—the 30-fathom level, and the 40-fathom level, just opened upon. The Nicholson's shaft is sunk 26 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft — the edit level, driven 30 fathoms; 10-fathom level driven 3 fathoms. The surface-shaft is sunk 30 fathoms. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 150 h.p., and a winding-engine for drawing the ores, refuse, &c., and for crushing; the mine is drained by one steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, blende, &c. This mine is now worked for tin and copper. The purser is Edward Burgess, of Camborne; the captain is John Prince. The London offices are at 57 Old Broad street; the secretary is William Nicholson, Esq.

Treloweth Copper Mine is in the parish of St. Erth, Cornwall. The secretary is E. J. Cole, of 2 New Broad street, London.

Trelusback Mine is in the township and parish of Stithians, union of Redruth, and hundred of Kerrier, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Stephen Nowal Usticke, and mining district of Stithians. It is situated 2 miles from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Perran,4 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1830, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by the Rev. Robert Nowal Usticke, of Penwarren in the parish of Budock. The country is granite, and the dip north. Granite is on the mine. The known lodes on the sett are eight:—The Tresavean great lode runs 6° south-west, and dips 6 inches in the fathom south; it consists of gossan, spar, peach, prian, mundic, and copper ore. The Magor's lode runs 10° south of west, and dips 2 feet south in the fathom; it consists of gossan, spar, and jack. The Martin's lode runs 4° north of west, and dips south. The known crosscourses are Wheal Buller, Penstruthal, and Wheal Sparnon. There have been three shafts sunk on Magor's lode: the engine-shaft is sunk 102 fathoms; the adit level is driven 100 fathoms on Magor's lode; the Tresavean shaft is sunk 10 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a 31-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin ores. This mine was first opened in 1850, and was worked by William Brunton and Messrs. Harvey and Co., under the name of Trelusback. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The purser is William Cock Vivian, of Camborne; the captain is James Thomas.

Trenance Iron Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. The proprietor is Joseph Morcom.

Tresavean Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, hundred of Kerrier, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Tresavean, and mining district of Gwennap. It is situated 2 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Perran, 44 miles, and Devoran, 5 from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Redruth, 22 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1846, at a royalty of 1-20th, granted by Rev. Canon Rogers and James Wentworth Buller, Esq. The country is granite and killas, and the dip north. The known lodes on the sett are two:— The old lode runs north-east and southwest, and dips south 15 inches in the fathom; it consists of copper ore. The north lode dips 24 feet in the fathom. There have been eleven shafts sunk. Harvey's shaft is sunk 306 fathoms from the surface. There are levels from adit to 310, every 12 fathoms. The 136-fathom level is driven on the course of the old lode 590 fathoms. The old east shaft is sunk 350 fathoms from the surface. There are the following levels in this shaft —the 218-fathom level is driven 320 fathoms; there are 28 levels in all, driven from 100 to 500 fathoms, and average price for driving is £14 per fathom. The adit level in centre of the mine is 40 fathoms, that in the western part 60. The mine is worked by seven steam-engines for crushing and stamping. It is drained by steam-engine, and is now worked for copper ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 96 shares, with £32 10s. paid, representing a capital of £3,120. The dividends in 1854 were £480, or £5 per share; and in 1855, £1,152, or £12 per share. The purser is Hugh Phillips, of Redruth; the captains are Joseph Jennings, Joseph Odgers, and Robert Roach.

Trethellan Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Gwennap. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Devoran, 5 miles distant from the mine; and the nearest railway station is at Carharrack, 2 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1840, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by William Grenfell, Esq., of Marazion, and Rev. H. M. St. Aubyn, of Clowance. The mine is worked by a steam-engine, with crusher attached. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened in 1836, and was worked by the name of Trethellan; and is now worked for copper, and produced in 1855, 348 tons of ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 120 shares, £13 paid, representing a capital of £1,560, which has been expended. The dividends in 1851 were £300, or £2 10s. per share. The purser is William Richards, Esq., of Bank house, Redruth.

Tretoil Mining Company, J. E. Square, secretary, 98 Gracechurch street, London.

Trevalga Slate Quarry is in the parish of Tintagel and Trevalga, union of Camelford, hundred of Lesnewth, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Trevalga and duchy of Cornwall. It is situated a quarter of a mile from the town of Boscastle, which is the nearest shipping place for slate. The nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 231 miles from London. The nearest granite is at Roughtor, 6 miles distant. The quarries are worked by a horse-whim. This quarry was first opened in 1806, and was worked by J. R. Avery, Esq., under the name of Growa and Lambshouse; it was afterwards worked under the name of the Trevalga Slate Company. This quarry is now worked for slabs and rooting slate. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 10,000 shares of £1 each, with 7,820 shares paid up. The dividends in 1855 were £500, or le. per share. The purser is R. P. Harding, of 4 Lothbury, London; the captain is Wm. S. Moyre.

Trevelyan Mine is in the parish of Perranuthoe, Cornwall. It is now worked for tin. The captain is J. Osborn, of Goldsithney, near Marazion. The London offices are at 13 George yard, Lombard street; the secretary is John Watson.

Treverbyn Iron Mines are in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. These are two distinct mines, although bearing the same name, one of which is the property of Drew, Andrews & Co., and the other is managed by William Hancock and Francis Barrett.

Treweatha Silver-Lead Mine is in the parish of Menheniot, Cornwall. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,096 shares. In 1855 the dividends were £849, or 4s. per share. The purser is J. A. Joseph; the captains are J. Richards and W. Rowe. The London offices are at 122 Bishopsgate street within; the secretary is J. A. Joseph.

Trewene United Lead Mine, St. Kew, Cornwall. John Goldsworthy, captain; William Richards, purser; William Henry Gray, engineer.

U

Union Tin Mine is in the parish of Roche, Cornwall. The depth of the mine is 50 fathoms. The captain is John Webb. The London offices are at 47 Old Broad street, City; the secretary is Richard C. Manuel.

United Copper Mines are in the parish of Gwennap, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 900 shares. In 1855, the dividends were £3,600, or £9 per share. A committee of management superintends the mine. The offices are on the mine.

V

Virtuous Lady Copper Mine is situated near Tavistock, Devon. The purser is Henry Wells, of Plymouth; the captain is — Goss. The London offices are at 76 Cornhill, and the secretary is Edward S. Codd.

W

Wendron Consols Tin Mine, Wendron, Cornwall. The office is at Helston. Were Fox Mine is now called Gunnislake.

West Alfred Consols Copper Mine, Phillack, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. The offices are at Hayle, Cornwall.

West Basset Copper Mine is in the parish of Camborne, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares. The dividends in 1854 were £9,000, or £1 10s. per share; and in 1855, £21,000, or £3 10s. per share. The secretary is J. Pascoe, 50 Threadneedle street, London.

West Caradon Copper Mine is in the parish of St. Cleer, Cornwall. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1840, at a royalty of 1-16th. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares. The dividends in 1851 were £3,200, or £12 10s. per share; in 1852 and 1854, £6,912, or £27 per share; in 1853, £12,032, or £47 per share; and in 1855, £4,352, or £17 per share. The purser is E. A. Crouch, of Liskeard.

West Crinnis Mine is in the parish of St. Austen, Cornwall. It is bounded on the east by Wheal Regent, and south by South Crinnis. On the north and west DO mines are at present at work. There are in the mine a 50-inch pumping-engine, and a 24-inch steam whim and crusher. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 3,000 shares. The captain is John Webb. The offices are at St. George's chambers, Birmingham.

West Cupid Mine is in the parish of Redruth, Cornwall. It is situated north of Pedn-an-drea, and adjoins the west part of Wheal Cupid; several tin and copper lodes run through it. It is situated in the junction of the granite and killas. Large returns were made in a former working above the edit; the present adventurers are sinking below to prosecute the mine in depth. It is divided into 108 shares. The purser is Thomas Garland, Fairfield, Redruth.

West Damsel Copper Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, Cornwall. The company consists of 256 shares. In 1854, the dividends were £1,536, or £6 per share; and in 1855, £2,560, or £10 per share. The purser is T. Michell, of Redruth.

West Fortescue Mine is in the parish of St. Winnow, union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Penlyne, and duchy of Cornwall; it is situated half a mile from the town of Lostwithiel. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Fowey, 6 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 27 miles from the mine, and 247 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royally of 1-18th, granted by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. The country is clayslate, arid the dip north-east. The known lodes on the sett are two:— No. 1 lode runs east and west, and dips 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of quartz, gossan, and silver-lead ore. No. 2 lode runs north and south, and dips 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of quartz, gossan, and silver ore. This mine is now worked for silver ore. The purser is Wm. J. White, of Bodmin; the captain is William Tregay.

West Fowey Consols Mine is in the parish of Tywardreath, Cornwall; it adjoins the Fowey Consols mine. The returns for the twelve months ending June, 1855, were £3,757, or an average of £313 per month. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,400 shares. The manager is Captain J. Mickey; the purser is Major Davis, R.M.; offices on the mine. The London agency is at 58 Old Broad street; the agent is William C. Foulkes.

West Frances Mining Company, Camborne, Cornwall.

West Par Consols Mine is in the parish of St. Blazey, Cornwall, and adjoining the Par Consols, Pembroke, East Crinnis, Great Crinnis, and other celebrated mines, which it is stated have yielded copper ore of the value of £5,000,000 sterling. The mine is worked by a 48-inch cylinder horizontal steam-engine. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 25,000 shares of £1 each; the amount expended to 1855 is £23,300. The purser is John Webb. The London offices are at 117 Bishopsgate street within; the secretary is John Henry Murchison.

West Providence Copper and Tin Mine is in the parish of St. Erth, Cornwall; it is situated about 3 miles south-east from the town of Hayle, and was first commenced in 1842. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1810, at a royalty of 1-18th. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,029 shares. The dividends, in 1851, were £2,560, or £2 10s. per share; in 1852, £10,752, or £10 10s. per share; in 1853, £6,656, or £6 10s. per share; in 1854, £3,328, or £3 5s. per share; and in 1855, £1,792, or £1 15s. per share. The purser is T. W. Robinson, of Hoyle.

West Rosewarne United Copper Mining Company, Gwinear, Cornwall.

West Sharp Tor Mine is in the parish of Linkinhorne, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Rillaton, duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Phoenix; it is situated 64 miles from the town of Liskeard, and the nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Looe, 15 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1849, granted by H.R.H. the Duke of Cornwall. The country is granite. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 60 h.p. This mine was first opened in 1850, and is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares, with £62 paid, representing a capital of £15,872; the amount expended to 1855 is about £15,000. The purser is Thomas Morris, of Tavistock; the captain is William Richards. The London offices are at 50 Threadneedle street; the secretaries are Messrs. Morris and Buckley.

West Sortridge Consols Copper and Tin Mines, Whitchurch, Devon. J. H. Murchison, secretary, 117 Bishopsgate street within, London.

West Stray Park Mine is in the township and parish of Camborne, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Pendarves, and mining district of Camborne; it is situated a quarter of a mile from the town of Camborne. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 5 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Camborne, a quarter of a mile from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the late E. W. W. Pendarves, Esq., of Pendarves. The country is killas and granite. There are eight lodes in the sett. The engine-shaft is sunk 100 fathoms from the surface. The mine is drained by a steam-engine, and is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,056 shares, with £7 5s. paid, representing a capital of £7,656. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne; the captains are Joseph Vivian, William Thomas, and Samuel Berryman.

West Trethellan Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Gwennap; it is situated 3 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Devoran, 5 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Carharrack, 2 from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1840, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the trustees of Lanyon's charity. The seine is drained by machinery. This mine was first opened in 1840, and is now worked for copper. The produce in 1855 was 36 tons of copper ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 120 shares, with £30 paid, representing a capital of £3,600, which has been expended. The purser is William Richards, Esq., of Bank house, Redruth.

West Wheal Damsel Copper Mining Co. Gwennap, Cornwall.

West Wheal Frances Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of East Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Tehidy, and duchy of Cornwall; it is situated 2 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 3 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Pool, 1 from the mine, and 270 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1854, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lady Baroness Grenville, of Boconnoc. The country is killas and granite. The known lodes on the sett are five. The first, third, and fourth lodes run east and west, and dip north 1 foot in the fathom; they consist of tin, copper, spar, iron, &c. The second lode runs east and west, and dips south 14 inches in the fathom; it consists of tin, copper, spar, and peach. The fifth lode runs east and west, dip not explored. There are three known crosscourses. There have been two shafts sunk: The first or engine shaft is sunk 95 fathoms; there are live levels in this shaft, driven east and west. The second shaft is sunk 80 fathoms; there are three levels in this shaft, two driven east and west, and one north. The machinery comprises one 40.'inch cylinder engine 9 feet stroke, with two boilers 10 tons each, and one 19-inch cylinder steam whim engine and stamps. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper. This mine was first opened in 1819, and was worked by a Cornish company, under its present name. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 512 shares, with £32 15s. paid, representing a capital of £16,768. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne; the captains are Charles Thomas and James Mayne.

West Wheal Level Mine is in the parish of Wendron, Cornwall. It is now worked for tin and copper. The London offices are at 77 Old Broad street; the secretary is H. B. Rye.

West Wheal Robins Mine is in the parish of St. Neots, Cornwall. This mine is now worked for tin and copper. The captain is Mr. George; of Liskeard. The London offices are at 13 George yard, Lombard street, and the secretary is John Watson.

West Wheal Seton Mine is in the parish of Camborne, union of Redruth, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Tehidy-,'and mining district of Camborne; it is situated 1 mile from the town of Camborne, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 3 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the late Baroness Basset, of Teddy, in the county ,of Cornwall. The country is killas, and the dip west. The sett is a mile long on the course of the lode, and half a mile wide. The mine is drained by steam. The minerals found in this sett are copper and a little tin. This mine was first opened in 1844, and is now worked for copper. The produce in 1851 was £2,415 19s. 4d.; in 1852, £6,499 5s. 7d.; in 1853, £9.849 14s. 8d.; in 1854, £15,002 11s. Id.; in 1855, £21,348 12s. 7d. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 400 (hut originally 200) shares, upon which £19,000 was called upon the adventurers. The amount expended to end October, 1855, is £62,127 9s. The dividends in 1854 were £3,000; and in 1855, £7,000. The purser is Mr. Benjamin Matthews, of St. Day; the managing captain is Joseph Jennings.

West Wheal Towan Mine is in the township of Redruth, parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Nancekuke, and mining district of Redruth; it is 4 miles from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station, and 270 miles from London. The nearest shipping place, for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 21 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by the executors of the late John Bassett, Esq., of London. The country is clayslate, and the dip westerly; the cleavage of the clayslate is very irregular. The nearest granite is three-quarters of a mile northward. The known lodes on the sett are three. The first lode runs 10° south of east, and clips north 2 feet in the fathom; it consists chiefly of quartz, copper lode. The second lode runs 5° south of east, and dips south 3 feet in the fathom; it consists of quartz and peach, tin lode. The third lode runs 15° south of east, and dips south 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of tin, mundic and quartz. The known crosscourses are two, composed of fit-lean and quartz. There have been four shafts sunk. The first shaft is sunk 85 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft: —The adit level is driven south 180 fathoms; the 20-fathom level is driven 200 fathoms; the 40-fathom level is driven 180 fathoms. The second shaft is sunk 80 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The adit level is driven 200 fathoms; the 15-fathom level is driven 130 fathoms; the 25-fathom level is driven 100 fathoms; the 35-fathom level is driven 70 fathoms; the 45-fathom level is driven 80 fathoms. The third shaft is sunk 90 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The edit level is driven 90 fathoms; the 15-fathom level is driven 50 fathoms; the 25-fathom level is driven 60 fathoms; the 31-fathom level is driven 40 fathoms; the 45-fathom level is driven 15 fathoms; the 55-fathom level is driven 40 fathoms. The fourth shaft is sunk 60 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:— The adit level is driven 30 fathoms; the 15-fathom level is driven 70 fathoms; the 25-fathom level is driven 70 fathoms. The mine is worked by a 60-inch cylinder steam-engine, with steam whim and stamp combined. The minerals found in this sett include tin, copper, and lead. This mine was first opened in 1850, and was worked by the present company, under the name of West Wheal Towan. The mine is now worked for tin, copper, and lead. The produce in 1851 was 42 tons of copper ore; in 1852, 864 tons of tin, and 37 tons of copper; in 1853, 114 tons of tin, and 351 tons of copper; in 1854, 96i tons of tin, 251 tons of copper, and 8 tons of lead; in 1855, 81 tons of tin, and 31 tons of copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 500 shares of £38 each, with £38 paid, representing a capital of £19,000. The amount expended to February, 1856, is £44,839 9s. 9d. The purser is J. P. Bennetts, of Falmouth; the captain is Jos. Ninnis. The London offices are at 6 Queen street place. The managers are John Taylor and Sons.

Wheal

Wheal Agar Mine is in the parish of Illogan, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of the Hon. Mrs. Agar, and mining district of Illogan; it is situated 11 miles from the town of Redruth, and is bounded on the north by North Pool, south by East Pool, east by South Tolgus, west by East Crofty, or in the centre of rich and productive mines. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 3 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Red run, 14 from the mine. The mine is held under lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by the Hon. Mrs. Agar, of Lanhydrock. The country is killas. The known lodes on the sett are the north lode, the south lode, Dobree's lode, East Pool lode, and Wheal Fortune lode. The mine is worked by a steam-engine, &c. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares. The captain is William Roberts, of Pool. The London offices are at 50 Threadneedle street. The secretaries are Messrs. Morris and Buckley.

Wheal Arthur Mine is in the parish of Calstock, Cornwall. This mine is now worked for copper. The produce, in 1855, was 2,417 tons of ore, realising £12,528 2s. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,228 shares. The dividends, in 1853, were £614, or 10s. per share; in 1851, £3,684, or £3 per share; and in 1855, £3,684, or £3 per share. The purser is William Watson, of Well park, Calstock; the captain is Thomas Carpenter. The London offices are at 2 Artillery place, Finsbury, and the secretaries are Messrs. Watson and Ensor.

Wheal Bal Tin Mine is in the parish of St. Just, Cornwall. It is divided into 240 shares, and the dividend declared, in 1855, was £1 per share. The purser is T. Carthew, of St. Just.

Wheal Basset Mine is in the parish of Illogan, Union of Redruth, Cornwall, and mining district of Basset; it is situated 11 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 5 miles from the Mine, and the nearest railway station is at Redruth, 11 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-15t1r, granted by the late Baroness Basset, of Tehidy park. The country is granite. The mine is worked by three steam-pumping engines, also three winding-engines, one winding-engine with stamps attached, and one winding-engine with crusher attached. The mine is drained by three pumping-engines. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine was first opened in 1832 by the present adventurers, under the name of Wheal Basset. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The produce, in 1851, was 5,421 tons of copper ore, value -933,230, and 102 tons of tin ore, value £5,374; in 1852, 5,985 tons of copper ore, value £43,129, and 12U tons of tin ore, value £6,607; in 1853, 7,184 tons of copper ore, value £60,590, and 63 tons of tin ore, value £4,433; in 1834, 8,344 tons of copper ore, value £65,758, and 46 tons of tin ore, value £3 221; in 1855, 7,759 tons of copper ore, value £71,668, and 22 tons of tin ore, value £1,382. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 512 shares with £5 2s. 61. paid on each, representing a capital of £2,624, which bus been expended. The dividends, in 1851, were £15,360, or £30 per share; in 1852, £21,760, or £42 10s. per share; in 1853, £30,720, or £60 per share; in 1854, £34.560, or £67 10s. per share; and in 18.55, £35,200, or £68 15s. per share. Total dividends from the commencement, £189,440. The purser and manager is William Richards, Esq., Bank house, Redruth.

Wheal Bawden Silver-Lead Mine is in the parish of St. Teath, Cornwall. The London offices are at George yard, Lombard street; the secretary is John Watson, Esq.

Wheal Bray Copper Mine, Altarnun, Cornwall. Samuel Bennett, captain; Richard Kittow, purser; West and Sons, engineers.

Wheal Brewer Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, and union of Redruth, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Gwennap. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Redruth. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Devoran, 5 miles from the mine, and t he nearest railway station is at Carharrack, 8 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years from 1851, at a royalty of 1-16th, granted by William Rashleigh, Esq., and the Rev. Canon Rogers. The mine is drained by the Trethellan machinery. The mineral found in this sett is copper. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 236 shares, with £8 paid, representing a capital of £2,048, which has been expended. The purser is Wm. Richards, Esq., Bank House, Redruth.

Wheal Buller Copper Mine is in the parish of Redruth, Cornwall. It is the best dividend mine in the county, and is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1849, at a royalty of 1-16th. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 256 shares; the dividends, in 1851, were £70 per share; in 1832, £97 10e.; in 1833, £177 10e.; in 1851, £210; and in 1855, £130; making a total of X507 10s. per share during five years. The pursers are S. and R. Davy, of Redruth.

Wheal Carpenter Copper Mine is in the parish of South Sydenham, Devon. It is situated about 5 miles west of Tavistock. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. There is steam-engine. The office is at Tavistock.

Wheal Came Tin Mine, St. Just, Cornwall.

Wheal Charlotte Mine is in the parish of Perranuthoe, union of Penzance, and hundred of East Penwith, Cornwall. It is situated 51 miles from the town of Penzance, which is the nearest shipping place for ores and machinery. The nearest railway station is at Marazion, 3 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by W. John Trevelyan, Esq. The country is killas and greenstone, and the dip is westward. The cleavage of the clayslate is horizontal generally; the nearest granite is at St. Michael's Mount, 2 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are three:— the engine lode rims south-east, and dips south 1 foot in the fathom, it consists of quartz, blend, mundic, lead, and copper; the south lode runs south-east, and dips south 15 inches in the fathom; it consists of the same as the engine lode; the north lode runs south-east, and dips south 1 foot in the fathom; this lode has not been explored to any extent. There is one known crosscourse, about 150 fathoms east of the engine-shaft, composed of greenstone. There have been three shafts sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 60 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft:—the 10-fathom level is driven east and west 150 fathoms; the 20-fathom level is driven 150 fathoms; the 30-fathom level is driven 100 fathoms; the 40-fathom level, 20 fathoms. The east shaft is sunk 40 fathoms; there are the following levels in this [shah— the 10-fathom level and 20-fathom level mentioned above. The western shaft is sunk 28 fathoms. The western shaft is 101) fathoms from engine shaft; the east shaft is 50 fathoms from engine shaft. The mine is worked and drained by a 24-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper, and a little tin and lead. This mine was first opened in 1832, by the present adventurers, R. R. Michell and Co., under the name of Wheal Charlotte. In 1855, this mine sold copper and tin ores to the value of £11,536 14s. 9d. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 10,024 shares, with £3 15s. paid, representing a capital of £37,592. The dividends, in 1854, were £512, or 104. per share; and, in 1855, £1,636, or 30s. per share. The purser is R. R. Michell, Esq., of Marazion; the captains are Benjamin Gundry and Michael W. Mitchell.

Wheal Clifford Copper Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, Cornwall. It is divided into 250 shares. The dividends in 1855 were £1,345, or £5 7s. 7d. per share. The pursers are Messrs. Williams & Son. Offices on the mine.

Wheal Coates Tin Mine, St, Agnes, Cornwall. This mine is working only in a very slight degree. The managers and pursers are Messrs. J. Taylor & Sons, 6 Queen street place, London.

Wheal Comfort Mine is in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Lord Clinton and others, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Gwennap. It is situated 2 Miles from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are Devoran and Portreath, 6 and 5 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by Lord Clinton and others. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the cost book system. The purser is Francis Pryor, of Redruth; the captain is John Dyer.

Wheal Crebor Mine is situate near Tavistock, Devon. The present company was formed in 1850; it is now divided into 4,096 shares. The London office is at 117 Bishopsgate street within; and the secretary is J. H. Murchison.

Wheal Cupid Mine is in the parish and union of Redruth, hundred of Penwith, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manors of Messrs. Williams and others, and mining district of Redruth. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Redruth, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at Portreath and Perran, 4 and 6 wiles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 18.50, at a royalty of 1-13th, granted by Messrs. Williams and Messrs. S. R. Davey. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1024 shares, with £I1 94.,5d. paid, representing a capital of £11,746 2s. 8d. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne; the captains are Joseph Vivian and Wm. Pryor.

Wheal Edward Mine is in the parish of Calstock, Cornwall. It is now worked for copper. The purser is William Watson, of Well Park, Calstock; the captain is Thomas Carpenter. The London offices are at 2 Artillery place, and the secretaries are Messrs. Watson and Ensor.

Wheal Emma Copper Mining Company, Buckfastleigh, Devon.

Wheal Exmouth and Adams United Mine is in the township and parish of Christow, union of St Thomas's, Exeter, hundred of Exeter, Devon, within the bounds of the manor of Lord Exmouth and of Messrs. Adams, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of river Teign; it is situated 10 miles from the town of Exeter. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Teignmouth, 14 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Newton Abbott, 10 from the mine. The mine is held under leases for 30 years, at a royalty of 1-13th, granted by Lord Exmouth and Messrs. Adams, of this parish. The country is schist and clayslate, and the dip easterly. The cleavage of the clayslate is oblique to the vein. The nearest granite is half a mile distant; a continuation of the Dartmoor range. The lode is traversed by a series of elvan courses or trap dikes, and an angle of the lode of about 33°, and runs northeast and south-west. There is local confusion near some of the hills. The known lodes on the sett are diversified and peculiar. The mine is a mass of mineralised ground, varying from 10 to 100 feet in width, containing splinters of rich veins. The lode in total runs 10° east of north, and dips from 1 to 3 feet in the fathom, easterly; it consists of a variety of earthy matter and mineral. The known crosscourses are elvan courses, bounded by trap westerly. There have been seven shafts sunk. The principal shaft is sunk nearly 80 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The 10 fathom level is driven 100 fathoms north and south; this is the only shaft worked in the mine. There are four levels driven (10, 20, 30, 40 under edit) about 100 fathoms in length. The machinery and plant are the best in the West of England. The mine is situated close to the seat of Viscount Exmouth; the buildings are all of an ornamental description and have a fine appearance. The mine is worked by two steam-engines; one of 220 h.p. on the Exmouth property, and one of 45 h.p. on the Adams property, and a winding-machine and a steam-crusher each of 30 h.p.; a 70-inch cylinder pumping-engine of 12 feet stroke, even beam, and a 30-inch cylinder pumping-engine of 8feet stroke, even beam; the drawing machine is 22-inch cylinder, 9 feet stroke in the piston, and 7 feet stroke out of the house. The crushing-engine was formerly used on the South Devon atmospheric railway, a 22-inch cylinder, 3 feet stroke, even beam. The mine is drained by the pumping-engines. The minerals found in this sett include silver, lead, and a small portion of copper. This mine was first opened and worked by different parties about twenty years ago by a Tavistock company, and afterwards by a London company. It was afterwards worked by Messrs. May and Bidwell, under the name of Wheat Exmouth and Adams United. This mine is now worked for silver-lead. The produce in 1851 was low; in 1854, 100 tons of ore a month; in 1855, 110 tons of ore a month, about 70 per cent, of which is metal. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,700 shares of £10 each, with £4 14s. paid. The dividend in October, 1855, was 2s. 6d. per share. The purser is Joseph Green Bidwell, of Exeter; the captain is James Hampton; the secretary is Charles Westcomb, of Exeter; the offices are at 21 Southernhay, Exeter.

Wheal Fortescue Mine is in the parish of St. Winnow, union of Bodmin, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Boconnoc, and mining district of Lostwithiel; it is situated 6 miles from the town of Bodmin. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Lostwithiel, 1 mile from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 26 from the mine, and 236 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lady Grenville, of Boconnoc, in the county of Cornwall. The nearest granite is 1; miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are:—One north and south lode, and two east and west. The north and south lode dips about 3 feet in the fathom; it consists of muriate of silver in a compact gossan. The mine is worked by three windlasses and kibbles. The mineral found in this sett has been silver only. This mine was first opened in the present year (1855 to 1856), under the name of Wheal Fortescue. This mine is now worked for silver. The produce in 1855 was 61 tons of ore, value £1,300. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,000 shares. The dividends in 1855 were £825, or 2s. 6d. per share. The pursers are William Ireland and Thomas Pearse; the captain is Richard Hooper.

Wheal Franco Copper Mine is in the parish of Buckland Monachorum, Devon; it is situated near Horrabridge, and about four miles from Tavistock. The mine is divided into 740 shares. The office of the company is at Tavistock.

Wheal Frank Mills Mine is in the township and parish of Christow, union of St. Thomas's, Exeter, hundred of Exeter, Devon, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Lord Exmouth, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of the river Teign; it is situated 10 miles from the city of Exeter. The nearest place for shipping ores and machinery is at Teignmouth, 14 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Newton Abbott, 10 miles from the mine. The mine is held ender a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-13th, granted by Lord Exmouth, of Canonteign House, in this parish. The country is schist and clayslate, and the dip easterly. The cleavage of the clayslate is oblique to the vein. The nearest granite is half a mile distant. The lode is traversed by elvan courses, and near the hills there is local disturbance. There is one lode which runs 100 east of north, and dips from 1 to 3 feet in the fathom easterly; it consist:, of earthy matter and the mineral. The known crosscourses are elvan courses, bounded by trap. There has been one shaft sunk 60 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft—the 30-fathom level is driven from 70 to 80 fathoms, and the 45 from 40 to 50 fathoms. There is one communication from the 30 to the 45 fathom level. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 60-inch cylinder, 10 feet stroke, even beam. The mine is drained by the engine, and the ore, at present, is drawn up by a horse-whin. The minerals found in this sett include silver-lead. This mine was first opened in 1854, and was worked by an Exmouth company, under the name of Wheal Frank Mills. This mine is now worked for lead, but has not yet made any return. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,000 shares, unlimited, with 11 15s. paid. The purser is Charles Westcomb, of Exeter; the captain is Joseph P. Nicholls; the offices are at 21 Southernhay, Exeter.

Wheal Friendship Mine is in the parish of Marytavy, union of Tavistock, hundred of Litton, Devon, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of Marytavy, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Tavistock; it is situated 4 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Morwellham, 8 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 19 miles from the mine, and 247 from London. The mine is held under a lease, granted by the late John Buller, of Molar], in the county of Cornwall. The country is killas, and the dip various. The nearest granite is at Dartmoor, about 1 mile distant. The three lodes on the sett run about east and west, and dip both north and south; they consist of copper principally, but have occasionally copper and tin in small quantities. The known crosscourses are three; two underlie north, and one south, and consist of trap and slate. There have been sixteen shafts and two inclined planes sunk; the deepest shaft is sunk 230 fathoms. The machinery is composed of –

  • 1 water wheel 51 feet 0 inch diameter and 12 feet 0 inch wide for pumping
  • 1 water wheel 51 feet 0 inch diameter and 11 feet 0 inch wide for pumping
  • 1 water wheel 50 feet 0 inch diameter and 7 feet 0 inch wide for pumping
  • 1 water wheel 43 feet 0 inch diameter and 5 feet 6 inch wide for pumping
  • 1 water wheel 40 feet 0 inch diameter and 5 feet 6 inch wide for drawing ores, &c.
  • 1 water wheel 26 feet 0 inch diameter and 3 feet 6 inch wide for drawing ores, &c.
  • 1 water wheel 13 feet 6 inch diameter and 10 feet 0 inch wide drawing ores, &c.
  • 2 water wheel 11 feet 0 inch diameter and 12 feet 0 inch wide for grinding and stamping ores.

The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, and lead. This mine was first opened in 1800, and was worked under the name of Wheal Friendship, and continues to he worked by the same parties, tinder the same name. This mine is now worked for copper, lead, and tin, as at first. The produce in 1851 was 2,447 tons of ore; in 1852, 2,977 tons of ore; in 1853, 1,776 tons of ore; in 1854, 1,426 tons of ore; in 1855, 1,783 tons of ore. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 128 shares. The amount expended to 1855, is £941,747 15s. 91., insurance included. The dividends, in 1851, were £1,792, or £14 per share; in 1852, £1,280, or £10 per share; in 1853, £2,304, or £18 per share; in 1854, £1,034, or £8 per share. The purser is J. Matthews, of Tavistock; the captains are Z. Williams and others. The London offices are at 6 Queen street place; the managers are John Taylor and Sons.

Wheal Gill Copper and Lead Mine, St. Ire, Cornwall. S. Vatcher, purser; W. Taylor and T. Richards, captains; Hocking and Loam, engineers

Wheal Gilmar Mine is in the parish of St. Erth, union of Penzance, Cornwall. It is situated 6 miles from the town of Marazion. The nearest railway station and shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 3miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1853, at a royalty of 1-18th in kind, and 1-22nd in money, granted by the late Mrs. Gilmer and Davis Gilbert, Esq., of Trelissick. The country is slate, and the dip of the lode 3 inches per fathom. The nearest granite is at Godolphin, 1 mile distant. The mine is worked by a 40-inch cylinder steam-engine. The machinery consists of one draught-engine, of 40-inch cylinder (diameter); and one stamping and winding engine, 22-inch cylinder, double acting. The mine is drained by the engine, 30 fathoms under adit; the edit is 22 fathoms from surface. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper ore. This mine was first opened in 1853, by the present company, under the name of Wheal Gilmar. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. The amount expended to 1856 is £8 000. The purser is R. R. Michell, of Marazion; the captain is William Johns.

Wheal Glynn Mine, Cardinham, near Bodmin, Cornwall. Purser, D. G. Goatley,3lThreadneedle st. London.

Wheal Grenville Mine is in the parish of Camborne, union of Redruth, hundred of East Penwith, Cornwall. It is situated 2 miles from the town of Camborne, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreatb, 5 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-20th, granted by Lady Grenville. The country is granite and clay-slate; and the dip of the latter northward. The known lodes on the sett are four. The old or main lode runs nearly magnetic east and west, and dips north 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of quartz, iron, mundic, and a small quantity of copper and tin ore. The Newton lode runs about 10° south-of-west, and dips south 18 inches in the fathom; it consists of quartz, prian, mundic, and tin. There have been three shafts sunk. The Old Engine-shaft is sunk 85 fathoms; the Newton Engine-shaft is sunk 30 fathoms. There are two steam-engines and other valuable plant on the mine, which is drained by steam-power. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. This mine was first opened in 1825, and was worked by a company of adventurers under the name of Polgim; it was afterwards worked by Mr. Lyle and others, under the name of Wheal Grenville. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares of £3 8s. each, all paid, representing a capital of £20.400. The purser is John Cady; the captain is George R. Odgers. The London offices are at 13 George yard, Lombard street; the secretary is John Watson, Esq.

Wheal Guskus Tin and Copper Mine, St. Hilary, Cornwall. Alfred Jeffree, secretary, 28 Queen street, Cheapside, London.

Wheal Harriett Mine is in the parish of Camborne, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Camborne. It is situated 11 miles from the town of Camborne, which is the nearest railway station, and 300 from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle, 6 miles distant from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by Lady Bassett. It is now worked for tin and copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5.120 shares, with £36 paid, representing a capital of £9,216. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne; the captain is J. Lyle, of Truro. The London offices are at 21 Austinfriars; the secretary is Edward King.

Wheal Hearl Mine, St. Just, Cornwall.

Wheal Hender Copper Mine, Crowan, Cornwall. This was formerly known as Copper Bolton Mine. It is now managed by the same persons as the Rosewarne.

Wheal Henry Mine is in the parish of Kenwyn, union of Truro, Cornwall, and within the bounds of the manor of Lord Falmouth. It is situated 5 miles from the town of Truro, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest chipping place for ores and machinery is at Devoran, 3 miles distant from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1842, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lord Falmouth. The mine is worked by virtue of steam-power, erected on St. Day United Mines. The mine is drained to 130-fathom level. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened in 1842, by the present adventurers, under the name of Wheal Henry. The purser is Francis Pryor, of Redruth; the captain is William Kitto.

Wheal Kitty Mine is in the parish of Uny Lelant, Cornwall. It is held under a lease, at a royalty of 1-15th. The depth of the mine is 120 fathoms, and the bottom levels have laid open a considerable quantity of good tin ground. This mine is now worked for tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 1,024 shares. The dividends in 1855 were £1,024, or £1 per share. The purser is W. Richards, of St. Agnes.

Wheal Kitty Mine is in the parish of St. Agnes, Cornwall. It is situated 12 miles from the town of Truro, which is the nearest railway station and shipping place for ores and machinery470 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-22nd; it is now worked for tin and copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 5,000 shares, with £4 10s. paid, representing a capital of £22,500. The purser is R. H. Pike, of Camborne; the captain is William Thomas. The London offices are at 27 Austinfriars; the secretary is Edward King.

Wheal Lewis Mine is in the parish of St. Erth, Cornwall, within the hounds of the manor of — Praed, Esq., and mining district of St. Erth. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Hayle, which is the nearest shipping place and railway station. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1844, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by Messrs. Praed, (Sundry and others, of Lelant. The country is killas, and the dip north-west; the nearest granite is at Tregonning hill, Breage,2 miles distant. The known lodes on the sett are three: —The north lode runs 4° north of east, and dips south 9 inches in the fathom; it chiefly consists of tin. The south lode runs 4 degrees south of east, and dips north 3 inches in the fathom; it consists of tin. There are two known crosscourses and seven working shafts. The engine-shaft is sunk 110 fathoms below edit. There are eleven levels in this shaft, driven, on the average, 150 fathoms. The mine is worked and drained by a 60-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include tin and copper. The mine is now worked for tin and copper. The company is on the costbook system. The purser is William Vawdrey, of Hayle; the captains are Wm. Truran and John Reece.

Wheal Langford Mine is in the township and parish of Callington, union of Liskeard, hundred of East Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor and mining district of Callington. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Cotehill quay, 4 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 14 miles from the mine, and 246 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1849, at a royalty of 1-12th for silver and 1-14th for copper, granted by R. Langford, Esq., of Liskeard. The country is killas, and the dip southerly; the cleavage of the clayslate is southerly; the nearest granite is at Kitt Hill, 1 mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are two:—The silver lode runs east and west, and dips south 21 feet in the fathom; it consists of flucan and carbonate of iron. The copper lode runs east and west, and dips south 21 feet in the fathom; it consists of spar, peach, and caple. There are no known crosscourses. There have been three shafts sunk. The engine shaft is sunk 45 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft—the 10, 20, 28, and 35-fathom levels are driven 241 fathoms. The David shaft is sunk 43 fathoms. The Malichy shaft is sunk to the 28-fathom level. The mine is worked and drained by a steam-engine of 163 h.p. The minerals found in this sett include silver and copper ore. This mine was filet opened in 1849, and was worked by Stephen Broad and others, under the name of Wheal Langford, and it continues to be worked by Stephen Broad under the same name. This mine is now worked for silver and copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 6,000 shares, with £1 10s. paid, representing a capital of £9,000. The purser is Mr. Crouch, of Liskeard; the captain is William Knott. The London offices are at 27 Austinfriars; the secretary is Edward King.

Wheal Ludcott Lead Mine, St. Ire, Cornwall. E. A. Crouch, purser; R. Knapp, captain; Hocking and Loam, engineers

Wheal Margaret Tin Mine is in the parish of Uny Lelant, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 112 shares. In 1855, the dividends were £1,904, or £17 per share. The purser is W. S. Arthur, of Penzance.

Wheal Margery Mine is in the township and parish of St. Ives, union of Madron, hundred of West Penwith, Cornwall, and within the mining district of Lelant. It is situated 2 miles from the town of St. Ives, which is the nearest railway station, and distant 272 miles from London. The nearest shipping places for ores and machinery are at St. Ives and Hayle, 2 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years. The country is killas, overlying the granite. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 100 h.p. The minerals found in this sett include tin and cop per ore. This mine is now worked for tin and copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 512 shares of £16 10a. each, all paid, representing a capital expended by adventurers, of £8,448. The total amount expended by adventurers and produce of the mine, to end of December, 1855, is £10,893 6s. 4d. The purser is Mr. Samuel Higgs, of Penzance; the captain is John Benbow, of St. Ives.

Wheal Mary Ann Lead Mine is in the parish of Menheniot, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 512 shares. The mine is worked by an 80-inch cylinder steam-engine. In 1855, the dividends were £1,280, or 104. per share. The depth of the mine is 120 fathoms. The purser is P. Clymo, jun., of Liskeard.

Wheal Mary Great Consols Mine is in the parish of St. Neot, union of Liskeard, Cornwall, and within the mining district of St. Neot. It is situated 6 miles from the town of Liskeard. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Looe, 12 miles from the mine, 8 of which by canal. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Messrs. Foster, of Lostwithiel, Bolith, of Chyandour, and Mitchell, of Lam pen. The country is clayslate, and the dip west; the cleavage of the clayslate is on an angle of 20° at some points, and at other places less; the nearest granite is at Bery Down, three-quarters of a mile distant. There are several north and south courses; and an east and west elvan course passing through the sett. The known lodes on the sett are seven, nearly parallel; they run 4° north of west, and dip about 2 feet in the fathom, and consist of caple, quartz, mundic, copper, and tin ore. There have been eight shafts sunk. The two engine-shafts are sunk 80 fathoms. There are the following levels: the 14, 25,30,40,50, 60, 70, and 80 fathom levels, driven on an average 60 fathoms, both east and west from these shafts. The mine is worked by a steam-engine of 141 h.p. for pumping. There is a water-wheel of 30 feet diameter by 5 feet abreast, for drawing, crushing, &c. The mine is drained by steam-power. The minerals found in this sett include copper end tin ores. This mine was last opened in 1852, and was worked several times before under the name of Wheal Mary; it was afterwards worked by the name of Wheal Mary Great Consols. The mine is now worked for tin and copper. The produce to the present time is copper, 574 tons, equal to £3,442, and tin, 3 tons. equal to £142. The purser is Charles Collins, Esq., of Exeter; the captains are T. Richards and John Taylor; the offices are at 8 Bedford circus, Exeter.

Wheal Maudlin Mine is in the parish of Lanlivery, union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Restormel, duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Bodmin. It is situated 3 miles from the town of Bodmin. The nearest shipping place tor ores and machinery is at Parr, 7 miles from the ,nine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 40 miles from the mine, and 240 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1851, at a royalty of 1-20th, granted by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall. The country is on the junction of clayslate and granite, and the dip north-east; the nearest granite is at the Tenement of Hele, a part of the sett. The known lodes on the sett are several—too numerous to mention, especially as they are but very little tried, except the great lode, which runs 35° south of east, and dips 5 feet in a fathom north-east, and is upwards of 30 feet wide. It consists of oxide of iron, iron pyrites, and copper and tin ores. The engine-shaft is sunk 60 fathoms; there are the following levels in this shaft — the adit level, 30 fathoms below surface, driven from the valley below 220 fathoms up to the shaft; the 7-fathom level below edit, driven south to cut the lode 15, and east and west on its course 40 fathoms; the 16-fathom level below edit, driven south to cut the lode 6 fathoms, and east and west in its course 15 fathoms; and the 20-fathom level, driven about 40 fathoms, and the 30-fathom level, driven about 20 fathoms. The old workings have been extensive and in some places the excavations more than usually large; in one place, for instance, called the Parlour, a coach and four might be turned round and round. The mine is worked and drained by powerful water-power. The minerals found in this sett include copper, tin, arc. This mine was first opened in ancient times, and was worked by several parties since, under various names. It is now worked by the present company, under the name of the Maudlin Mine. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 3,000 shares of £3 each, with £3 paid, representing a capital of £9,000. The amount expended to end of 1855 is about that amount beyond the amount of copper and tin sold. The purser is Frederick William P. Cleverton, Esq., of Plymouth; the captain is William Tregay, of Lostwithiel. The London offices are at 3 Old Broad street; the secretary is Samuel Cardozo, Esq.

Wheal Messer Copper Mine, Lanivet, Cornwall. John Watson, secretary, 13 George yard, Lombard street, London.

Wheal Olive Mine is in the parishes of Callington and Southill, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall. It is situated 1 mile from the town of Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Cotehill quay, 51 miles from time mine, and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 15 miles from the mine, and 261 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from November, 1855, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Lord Ashburton to George Martin Penaluna and Robert Serjeant. The mine is in a very light killas; the nearest granite is at Kit Hill, 1 mile distant. One edit has been driven east 50 fathoms by the ancients, and no doubt but what great quantities of tin were returned by them. This being a private adventure at present, it is not yet divided into shares. The offices are at Callington, and the managers are the owners.

Wheal Owles Tin Mine is in the parish of St. Just, Carnival. It is divided into 80 shares. The dividends in 1855 were £920, or £11 10s. per share. The purser is J. Boynes, of St. Just.

Wheal Pollard Mine immediately adjoins Craddock Moor, and takes the run of the Vivian lode. The mine is worked by a steam-engine, and the shaft has been sunk to intersect the lode 25 fathoms below the atilt. The captain is Mr. Nance, of Crow's Nest, near Liskeard; the London offices are at 13 George yard, Lombard street; the secretary is John Watson.

Wheal Poule Mine, St. Just, Cornwall.

Wheal Reeth Mine is in the parish of Uny Lelant, union of Penzance, Cornwall. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at St. Ives, four miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-20th. The mine is worked by four steam-engines, from 36 to 20 inch cylinders. The purser is Richard Pearce, of Penzance.

Wheal Robert Mine is in the township and parish of Sampford Spiney, union and hundred of Tavistock, Devon, within the bounds of the manor or lordship of R. P. Collier, Esq., M.P., and mining district of Tavistock. It is situated 4 miles from the town of Tavistock. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Tavistock wharf, 4 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station at Plymouth, 10 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1852, at a royalty of 1-18th, granted by R. P. Collier, Esq., M.P., of Grimstone house, Horrabridge. The country is killas, and the dip north. The nearest granite is at Walkhampton, half a mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are two copper. There is only one known crosscourse, which consists of flucan, spar, and elvan course. There have been two shafts; one sunk 60 fathoms from surface. The engine-shaft is sunk 30 fathoms. The 30-fathom level is driven about 20 fathoms west. The mine is worked and drained by a water-wheel 20 feet by 10 feet. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine was first opened about 25 years since, and was worked by Capt. John Paull and others, under the name of Wheal Robert; it was afterward-, worked by a London company under the same name. This mine is now worked for copper. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4,000 shares. The purser is W. B. Harvey, of Tavistock; the captain is William Neile.

Wheal Robins Mine is in the parish of St. Neot, union of Liskeard, hundred of West, Cornwall. It is situated 6 miles from the town of Liskeard. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Moorswater, 4.5 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease fur 21 years, at a royalty of 1-16th, granted by Richard Foster, Esq., of Lanlivery. The country is slate and granite. The shaft is sunk 50 fathoms. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The purser is Richard Clogg, of Liskeard; the captain is James Nance. The London, offices are 15 George yard, Lombard street; the secretary is John Watson.

Wheal Russell Copper Mining Company, Tavistock, Devon.

Wheal Seton Mine is in the parish of Camborne, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manors of Seton and Pendarves, and mining district of Camborne; it is situated 1 mile from the town of Camborne, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Portreath, 4 miles from the mine. The mine is held under a lease, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by Seton and Pendarves, Esqrs. The country is killas, and the dip west. The cleaveage of the clayslate is north-south. The nearest granite is at Camborne Beckon, 1 mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are five, one of which runs east-west, and dips 3 foot in the fathom; it consists of copper, tin, mundic, &c. There are three known crosscourses. The mine is drained by steam-power. The minerals found in this sett include copper and tin. The mine is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 198 shares, with £107 paid, representing a capital of £Z1,186. The dividends in 1855 were £1,387, or £7 per share. The purser is T. H. Tilly, Esq., of Falmouth; the captain is William Pryor.

Wheal Sidney Tin Mine, Plympton, Devon. A committee of management conducts the affairs of this mine. Mr. T. James, of Plympton, is the chairman.

Wheal Trebarvah Copper Mine, Perranutho, Cornwall. Robert Daly, secretary, 16 Union court, Old Broad street, London.

Wheal Trelawny Lead Mine is in the parish of Liskeard, Cornwall. The company consists of 520 shareholders. In 1853, 1854 and 1855 the dividends were £9,880. The purser is J. Philp, of Liskeard; the captains are W. Bryant and W. Jenkins.

Wheal Tremayne Copper and Tin Mine is in the parish of Gwinnear, Cornwall. The machinery consists of two pumping engines of 50 and 60-inch cylinders, a 20-inch engine for stamping, and an 18-inch winding engine. The amount realised, in 1855, for tin ore, was £7,650 9s. 10d., and for copper ore £355 10s. 8d. The mine is divided into 1,024 shares. In 1851, 1852, 1853 and 1854, the dividends were respectively £:3 103., £3 5s., 10s., and 7s. 6d. per share.

Wheal Tristrem Mine is in the parish of St. Austell, Cornwall. It adjoins West Par Consols, and is in the immediate neighbourhood of Great Crennes, Charlestown United, Par Consols, and other mines of repute. This mine is now worked for copper and tin. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 3,000 shares. The purser is James Jenkin. The London offices are at 55 Old Broad street, City.

Wheal Unity Mines are in the parish of Gwinnear, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manors of Mr. St. Aubyn, Mr. Buller, and the Rev. Mr. Peters, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Gwinnear. It is situated 5 miles from the town of Camborne, which is the nearest railway station. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Hayle. The mines are held under leases for 21 years, at a royalty of 1-18th and 1-15th, granted by Mr. St. Aubyn, Messrs. Pendarves and St. Aubyn, and Mr. Buller. The country is killas. These mines are now worked for copper and tin. The London offices are at 6 Great Winchester street; the agent is R. Smith.

Wheal Uny Tin and Copper Mine, Redruth, Cornwall. J. Hutt, secretary, 69 Lombard street, London.

Wheal Venton Silver-Lead Mine, Menheniot, Cornwall. W. George, captain; the purser and secretary is John Watson, 13 George yard, Lombard street, London.

Wheal Vyvyan Mine is in the parish of Constantine, union of Falmouth, hundred of Kerrier, Cornwall, within the hounds of the manor or lordship of Merthen. It is situated 6 miles from the town of Helston. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Gweek, 21 miles from the mine, and the nearest railway station is at Redruth, 10 miles from the mine, and 260 miles from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by Sir R. R. Vyvyan, of Trelowarren. The country is granite. The lode runs 6° south of east, and dips 4.25 feet in the fathom. The mine is now worked for copper ore and tin. The company is on the costbook system. The purser is William Carne, Esq., of Falmouth; the captain is James Bryant; the offices are on the mine.

Wheal Whitleigh Silver Lead Mine is not working.

Wheal Williams Mine is in the parish of Calstock, union of Liskeard, hundred of East, Cornwall, within the bounds of the manor of Calstock, and duchy of Cornwall, and mining district of Tavistock; it is situated 5 miles from the town of Tavistock, and 4 from Callington. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at Calstock, 4 miles from the mine; and the nearest railway station is at Plymouth, 21 miles from She mine and 220 from London. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, granted by the duchy of Cornwall. The country is a Relit clayslate, and the dip east and north. The cleavage of the clayslate is nearly flat. The nearest granite is at South Devon Consols Mine, 1 mile distant. The known lodes on the sett are six, but four only have been wrote-Alt on. The North Caple lode runs 5° south of east, and dips north 3 feet in the fathom; it consists of caple, spar, mundic, and yellow copper ore. The Wheal Maria lode runs 16° south of east, and dips north 2 feet in the fathom; it consists of spar, caple, mundic, and yellow copper ore. This lode is heaved by the eastern crosscourse, 4 feet. The middle or orchard lode runs 13° south of east, and dips 2 feet north in the fathom; it consists of caple, spar, mundic, and black and yellow copper. South Gossan lode runs 19° south of east, and dips south 1 foot in the fathom; it consists of gossan, soft spar, mundic, and copper ore. The known crosscourses are two, passing through the sett, and consist of spar and flucan. There have been six shafts sunk. The north engine shaft is sunk 42 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:— The 40-fathom level is driven west 42 fathoms, and east 11 fathoms. The 17-fathom level is driven east about 40 fathoms, and west 60 fathoms. A crosscut has been driven South about 28 fathoms. The small whim shaft is sunk 28 fathoms. The 28-fathom level in this shaft is driven west 9 fathoms. The Old engine-shaft is sunk 35 fathoms, and the levels are driven some short distance. The middle or Orchard lode shaft is sunk 28 fathoms. The 28-fathom level crosscut is driven 3 fathoms north. The south lode engine-shaft is sunk 36 fathoms. There are the following levels in this shaft:—The 30-fathom level is driven east 28 fathoms, and west 2 fathoms. The 20-fathom level is driven east many fathoms, and west about 8 fathoms. From the stopes in the back of this level east, several tons of rich black and yellow copper ore were raised. The mine is worked and drained by a 46-inch cylinder steam-engine. The minerals found in this sett include copper. This mine is now about to resume working, with a paid-up capital. The company is on the costbook system. The London offices are 11 New Broad street; the secretary is W. L. Webb.

Wheal Wreeth Mine, Uny Lelant, Cornwall.

Wheal Wrey Lead Mine is in the parish of St. Ive, Cornwall. The company is on the costbook system. and consists of 4,096 shares. In February, 1855, a dividend of 4s. per share was declared. The purser is P. Clymo, jun.; the captains are W. Hancock and R. Roskelly; the engineers are W. West and Sons.

Wheal Zion Copper and Silver-Lead Mine, Calstock, Cornwall. John Sims, purser; Alfred Jeffree, secretary, 28 Queen street, Cheapside, London.

Wood Mine is in the parish of Beer Ferris, Devon, and mining district of the Tamar mines. It is situated 12 miles from the town of Plymouth, which is the nearest railway station, 246 from London. The nearest shipping place for ores and machinery is at the Tamar. The mine is held under a lease for 21 years, from 1850, at a royalty of 1-15th, granted by the Earl of Mount Edgcumbe, Plymouth. This mine is now worked for silver-lead. The company is on the costbook system, and consists of 4.096 shares, with £23 6s. paid, representing a capital of £4,812 16s. Tire purser is William Watson, of Calstock; the captain is Captain Cock; the London offices are 27 Austinfriars; the secretary is Edward King.

Y

Yeoland Consols Mine is in the parish of Buckland Monachorum, Devon. It is situated 8 miles from the town of Plymouth. A 36-inch steam-engine drives 24 heads of stamps, and pumps the water from the mine; there is also a 22-inch drawing-machine. The tin sold from the commencement of operations, in 1851. has realised £13,000. The company is on the cost book system and consists of 4,096 shares. The London offices are at 76 Cornhill; the secretary is Edward S. Codd.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1856 Post Office Directory of Cornwall