Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Napier and Miller

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Napier and Miller were based at Old Kilpatrick and made over 120 ships before going out of business due to the Depression.

1898 The company began as a limited liability company in 1898 and took over the yard next door which had previously been owned by Napier, Shanks and Bell.

1906 The company moved to a new five berth site at Old Kilpatrick as their land was acquired by the Clyde Navigation Trust to build a new dock. This new site was well designed and also had sufficient surrounding space to allow for expansion should it be required. Work began on the first ship this year, Irish Monarch, followed by steam tramps and the last two barques built in Britain for home ownership.

WWI - The yard made sloops, minesweepers and aircraft along with merchant ships. The yard also continued making standard vessels such as an "AO" tanker and "A" types.

1920s - The yard made passenger ships and Great lakes traders for American, Canadian and Norwegian companies. A further 26 ships were made between 1923 and 1930, amongst which a pair made for Prince Line, were the largest ever made at the yard.

1930 - The last ship completed at the yard was Penerf. The yard was bought up by National Shipbuilders Security this year; it was the first yard to have this happen to it.

1931 - The contents of the yard were sold off and the yard demolished.

Aircraft

  • WWI: Assembly of some aeroplanes

See Also

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Sources of Information

  • British Shipbuilding Yards. 3 vols by Norman L. Middlemiss
  • Aeroplanes of the Royal Flying Corps (Military Wing) by J. M. Bruce. Published 1982 ISBN 0-370-30084-x